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Archive for the ‘Nutrition & Dietetics CE’ Category

Three Ways Nutrition Improves Addiction

15 Sep

By Claire Dorotik-Nana @pdresources.org

nutrition and addictionFor clients recovering from addiction, so often the primary focus of treatment is on achieving and maintaining sobriety. And while effective therapy depends on sobriety, what is often missed are the client’s nutritional deficiencies – many that can dramatically increase the chances of picking up again.

Clients can, for example, have vitamin B, folate, and iron deficiencies, all of which will lead to general feelings of fatigue, lethargy, and poor cognitive functioning. On the other hand, depleted tryptophan (an amino acid often found in milk, turkey, and dairy products) stores can lead to depleted serotonin stores, and ultimately, states of mild depression.

More often than not, clients in recovery are not aware of their deficiencies and perhaps more importantly, the ways in which they affect how they feel. Yet following an improved nutritional program – one that addresses the common deficiencies of addiction – dramatically improves the way clients feel in many ways. Here are just three:

Increased Energy

Maintaining energy relies on regulating blood sugar, and maintaining adequate vitamin and mineral stores. However, both of these things depend on one thing only – nutrition. When clients follow a nutritional program designed to stabilize blood sugar, energy levels stabilize as well, and more often than not, clients experience more consistent and reliable feelings of energy. Further, when, through a healthy dietary intake of vitamins and minerals, deficiencies are restored, the body responds through better recovery, which lies at the heart of adequate energy levels. What this ultimately means for the client seeking sobriety, is less reliance on energy shortcuts – such as amphetamines or stimulants – to boost energy, and an improved sense of well-being.

Better Cognitive Functioning and Memory

Sobriety from any drug requires a wealth of frustration tolerance, emotional containment, and the ability to override strong impulses with and even stronger set of executive functions. In short, the brain in recovery is the brain on overdrive. Yet one hallmark of clients in recovery is poor executive functioning. Often not just repeated use of drugs and alcohol but an atrophied set of executive functions lead to a less than optimal ability to tolerate the stress of achieving sobriety. However, we also know that optimal brain functioning requires an optimal supply of nutrients. Through increasing intakes of Omega-3 Fatty acid, for example, memory and cognitive functioning can be improved significantly. Vitamins E, D, and several amino acids have also shown dramatic results on improved brain functioning. What this means for the client in recovery, is not only that they can rectify nutrient deficiencies, but that their cognitive functioning – and their chance of recovery – can be dramatically improved when they do.

Enhanced Mood

An unstable mood for the client in recovery is a major risk factor for relapse. Especially when clients are new in recovery and may not have the cognitive resources to overcome the strong impulses that accompany mood swings, the result can often be turning to their drug of choice. Moreover, an unstable mood often complicates the development of the very social support that fosters recovery. Yet a stable mood is dependent on a set of neurochemicals that may not be in abundant supply for the client in recovery. Therefore, replacing and fortifying neurochemicals becomes a primary step in stabilizing and improving mood. As neurochemicals are comprised of amino acids, this requires an adequate nutritional intake of them. Through improving their amino acid profile, clients can often quite markedly improve their mood, which then ripples outward improving their recovery program, and their adjustment to sober life.

Related Online Continuing Education (CE) Courses:

Nutrition and Addiction: Advanced Clinical Concepts is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines addiction from a nutritional perspective. Drug addiction is an alarming problem in America, and one that is not receiving the treatment it needs. Compounding the problem is that addiction often leads to nutritional deficiencies, which predisposes the addict to a host of related health complications. Treatment recovery programs that also offer nutritional education have been found to significantly improve three-month sobriety success rates. The first section of this course will take a look at the etiology of addiction, related neurochemical factors and physiological components. The second section will focus on the nutrient deficiencies associated with addiction, along with the resultant effects on mood, cognition and behavior. The last section – the clinician’s toolbox – will give you, the clinician, targeted nutritional interventions and exercises that you can use with your clients to not just improve their recovery rates, but their overall mental health and wellbeing. Course #21-14 | 2017 | 30 pages | 15 posttest questions

Nutrition and Mental Health: Advanced Clinical Concepts is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that examines how what we eat influences how we feel, both physically and mentally. While the role of adequate nutrition in maintaining mental health has been established for some time, just how clinicians go about providing the right nutritional information to the patient at the right time – to not just ensure good mental health, but actually optimize mood – has not been so clear. With myriad diets, weight loss supplements and programs, clients often find themselves reaching for the next best nutritional solution, all the while, unsure how they will feel, or even what to eat to feel better. On the other side of the equation, clinicians so often face not just a client’s emotional, situational, and relational concerns, but concerns that are clearly mired in how the client feels physically, and what impact his/her nutritional health may have on these concerns. For example, research into the role of blood sugar levels has demonstrated a clear crossover with client impulse control. Additionally, the gut microbiome, and its role in serotonin production and regulation has consistently made clear that without good gut health, mitigating anxiety and depression becomes close to impossible. So if good mental health begins with good nutritional health, where should clinicians start? What advice should they give to a depressed client? An anxious client? A client with impulse control problems? This course will answer these questions and more. Comprised of three sections, the course will begin with an overview of macronutrient intake and mental health, examining recent popular movements such as intermittent fasting, carb cycling and ketogenic diets, and their impact on mental health. In section two, we will look specifically at the role of blood sugar on mental health, and research that implicates blood sugar as both an emotional and behavioral regulator. Gut health, and specifically the gut microbiome, and its influence on mood and behavior will then be explored. Lastly, specific diagnoses and the way they are impacted by specific vitamins and minerals will be considered. Section three will deliver specific tools, you, the clinician, can use with your clients to assess, improve and maximize nutrition to optimize mental health. Course #11-06 | 2017 | 21 pages | 10 posttest questions

These online courses provide instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion.

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

 

Aging: Challenges for Clinicians

12 Sep

New Online CE Course @pdresources.org

Aging: Challenges for CliniciansAging: Challenges for Clinicians is a new 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that provides a review of the aging process, illustrating potential challenges and effective solutions.

Americans are living longer and there are proportionately more older adults than in previous generations due to the post-World War II baby boom. Many Americans are now living into their eighties and beyond. In healthcare, the volume of older people may soon outnumber the supply of healthcare professionals trained in geriatrics.

Aging presents many challenges for people as they encounter new physical and psychosocial issues. It is vital for healthcare professionals to be familiar with the challenges of aging in order to effectively treat the aging population. This course will provide information on the normal process of aging, and point out problems commonly thought to be normal that require medical or psychological evaluation and treatment. Case examples will illustrate scenarios of aging persons who may be at risk but are not aware there is a problem. Use this information for referral as appropriate to ensure the highest level of functioning for your patients.

Course #31-01 | 2017 | 54 pages | 20 posttest questions


Click here to learn more.

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion.

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund

01 Sep

Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund @pdresources.org

Our thoughts are still with everyone affected by Harvey, but, like you, we want to do more to help. Knowing that cash is king, we will donate 5% of net sales during September to the American Red Cross Hurricane Harvey campaign.

Are you looking for ways to help? Click here to read Helping Out After Hurricane Harvey: Where, What & How To Donate.

Harvey Relief Fund

Personal note: My husband is a flood adjuster and is leaving home (Jacksonville, FL) this afternoon to head out to Texas to help (along with thousands of others) get everyone back into their homes as quickly as possible. As a native Floridian, I have seen my share of hurricanes and the turmoil they create. My heart goes out to all of the people and animals affected by Harvey. Please be safe and know that help is on the way. :)

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

 

Autism: Clues to the Mystery Quiz

11 Aug

Autism Spectrum Disorder: Clues to the Mystery Quiz from Health IQ

Autism remains a mystery to doctors and parents. To learn more about the mysteries behind autism, test your knowledge with this interactive quiz…

Autism: Clues to the Mystery QuizAutism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been studied thoroughly and yet there are still numerous mysteries to these types of behavioral disorders. To make matters worse, there are several contradicting study results that only confuse the public more about ASD. For instance, a study released in 1997 claimed that the measles vaccine was linked to autism. This study has since been disproven across nine separate research reports. Thus, it’s easy to see why behavioral disorders like ASD are such a mystery to doctors and parents.

There is a lot more about ASD that we don’t know than we do, but it’s still important to understand as much as you can about ASD so that you can detect it early. We know that ASD can be diagnosed as early as age two and that screenings at a young age can help identify any behavioral disorders early on.

We have also learned a great deal about teaching parents to properly manage children that do have ASD. In fact, there are many training courses that parents can take to help better understand how to properly work with a child that has ASD. Even though there are no current cures for ASD, in many instances, proper management, behavioral therapy, and medication can all help mitigate the severity of the disorder.

Understanding ASD, its causes, and treatment are all important tools to help you work with a child who suffers from autism. If you’d like to learn more about the mysteries behind ASD, you can test your knowledge by taking the interactive quiz below.

About Health IQ

HealthIQ’s mission is to improve the health of the world. In pursuit of this mission, they’ve created over 2,000 quizzes and worked with innovative insurance companies to create financial rewards for health-conscious people. To date, Health IQ has helped thousand triathletes, vegans, runners, and other health conscious people secure billions in life insurance coverage, and they hope to expand to other financial rewards in the near future.

Health IQ’s Learn About Life Campaign:

Learn About Life is an educational campaign that aims to increase the world’s health & wealth literacy levels. To accomplish this task, Health IQ has partnered with a select group of nonprofits and bloggers to produce and promote thousands of health & wealth quizzes. If you’re a nonprofit or blogger and want to learn about how you can support this campaign, email teamiq@healthiq.com with subject line “Learn About Life…I’m In”

Related Online Continuing Education (CE) Courses:

Applied Behavior Analysis for Autism is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides evidence-based behavioral interventions for the minimally verbal child with autism. The prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) currently seems to be holding steady at one in 68 children (or 1.46 percent). The communication challenges of these children are widely known and require specialized early interventions to overcome them. This course presents evidence-based strategies that can enable students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and others who are verbally limited, to become more effective communicators. The focus will be on the minimally verbal child, the child who has a very small repertoire of spoken words or fixed phrases that are used communicatively. Included are: an overview of autism spectrum disorder, an introduction to the science of applied behavior analysis, the use of manding in communication training, techniques for direct instruction programming, and inter-professional collaboration strategies. Major points are illustrated throughout by case studies from actual practice. Course #21-15 | 2017 | 43 pages | 15 posttest questions

Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence-Based Screening and Assessment is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that summarizes proven approaches to screening, assessing and diagnosing ASD in children and young adults. Epidemiological studies indicate a progressively rising prevalence trend in the number of individuals identified with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) over the past decade. Yet, compared with general population estimates, children and youth with mild to moderate symptoms of ASD remain an underidentified and underserved population in our schools and communities. The DSM-5 conceptualizations of autism require professionals in clinical, school, and private practice settings to update their knowledge about the spectrum. In addition, professionals should be prepared to recognize the presence of risk factors and/or early warning signs of ASD and be familiar with screening and assessment tools in order to ensure that individuals with ASD are being identified and provided with the appropriate programs and services. The objectives of this course are to identify DSM-5 diagnostic changes in the ASD diagnostic criteria, summarize the empirically-based screening and assessment methodology in ASD, and describe a comprehensive developmental approach for assessing children, adolescents, and young adults with ASD. Course#30-94 | 2017 | 49 pages | 20 posttest questions

Autism: The New Spectrum of Diagnostics, Treatment & Nutrition is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews diagnostic changes in autism as well as treatment options and nutrition interventions – both theoretical and applied. The first section traces the history of the diagnostic concept of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), culminating in the revised criteria of the 2013 version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the DSM-5, with specific focus on the shift from five subtypes to a single spectrum diagnosis. It also aims to provide epidemiological prevalence estimates, identify factors that may play a role in causing ASD, and list the components of a core assessment battery. It also includes brief descriptions of some of the major intervention models that have some empirical support. Section two describes common GI problems and feeding difficulties in autism, exploring the empirical data and/or lack thereof regarding any links between GI disorders and autism. Sections on feeding difficulties offer interventions and behavior change techniques. A final section on nutritional considerations discusses evaluation of nutritional status, supplementation, and dietary modifications with an objective look at the science and theory behind a variety of nutrition interventions. Other theoretical interventions are also reviewed. Course #40-41 | 2017 | 62 pages | 25 posttest questions

Autism Movement Therapy is a 2-hour video-based online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that teaches professionals how to combine movement and music with positive behavior support strategies to assist individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Autism Movement Therapy® is an emerging therapy that combines movement and music with positive behavior support strategies to assist individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in meeting and achieving their speech and language, social and academic goals. Its purpose is to connect left and right hemisphere brain functioning by combining patterning, visual movement calculation, audile receptive processing, rhythm and sequencing into a “whole brain” cognitive thinking approach that can significantly improve behavioral, emotional, academic, social, and speech and language skills. This course is presented in two parts. Part 1 summarizes what is known about the brain functioning of individuals with ASD and illustrates how participation in dance, music and the arts can render the brain more amenable to learning social and language skills. Part 2 is a documentary created by Joanne Lara – Generation A: Portraits of Autism and the Arts, which spotlights – from a strikingly positive perspective – the challenges and accomplishments of eight individuals with ASD. Course #20-82 | 2014 | 106 minute video | 14 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

Hard Commitments for Weight Loss

31 Jul

Course excerpt from Behavioral Strategies for Weight Loss

Hard Commitments for Weight LossHard commitments are the reason we don’t speed, steal from the store, or cheat on our taxes – because we’d rather not pay the fine. And hard commitments do shape behavior. Smokers smoke less when hit with a hefty tax on cigarettes. People do drive slower in school zones when the price of a speeding ticket is doubled. And if you have to blow into a breathalyzer to start your car – a very common DUI penalty – you are lot less likely to drive drunk.

So the question is: which commitment works better? Asking just this question, RAND Corporation tested both hard and soft commitments on participants’ savings behavior, and came to this conclusion:

“Hard commitment accounts may not appeal to impatient individuals, those who do not anticipate their own self-control problems, or to the poor for whom restrictions on scarce funds can be particularly painful. We test a new ‘soft’ commitment account that asks borrowers to think about their savings goals, how it would feel to achieve them, and make a pledge to work towards these goals (potentially increasing one’s intrinsic motivation), yet has no external restrictions on savings behavior. In a six-month randomized savings experiment we find that such soft commitments can significantly increase amounts saved on day one relative to either a hard commitment account (with external restrictions on withdrawals) or a traditional savings account. Additionally, the soft commitments significantly increased final savings balances relative to no form of commitment and were particularly effective for impatient individuals. However, despite the inherent illiquidity, the hard commitment account proved most effective in building savings balances amongst our participants at the end of six months” (Burke, et al., 2014).

Hard commitments may not appeal to those who don’t anticipate their own self-control problems. If there is anything we should know about weight loss, it is that it is precisely a problem that catches our self-control off guard. We simply don’t anticipate that the juicy burger will be that much harder to resist when it is right in front of us, or that going for a run will not feel as good when we are doing it versus when we think about doing it, or that the minute we start to doubt our ability to reach our weight loss goal we will convince ourselves that a bowl of ice cream after dinner won’t really matter much. And because we don’t anticipate the way our self-control will be affected, we probably also don’t anticipate just how much self-control we will need – or the type of commitment that motivates it.

An article titled, “Put Your Money Where Your Butt Is,” found similar conclusions. Smokers were offered the incentive to open a saving account with the express purpose of giving themselves an incentive to quit. Six months after opening the account, smokers were required to take a urine test for tobacco. If the test showed positive for tobacco – indicating that they had been unable to quit – smokers lost the balance in their savings account. While the contract was taken up by only 11 percent of the participants to which it was offered, those who did participate had significantly better smoking cessation rates than the control group, and the results held up in a twelve-month follow up (six months after participants were allowed to withdraw their money) (Gine, et al., 2010). In an annual review of commitment devices, which included examination of hard and soft commitments, researchers concluded, “We suggest that a hard commitment would decrease enrollment, but increase retention” (Bryan, Karlan, & Nelson, 2010).

The takeaway is that what looks easy in weight loss is not. The easy option is to not put your money – or anything else – on the line. And yet what studies like the one above underscore is that when it comes to weight loss, we need all the leverage on ourselves that we can get.

Click here to learn more.

Behavioral Strategies for Weight LossBehavioral Strategies for Weight Loss is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that exposes the many thought errors that confound the problem of weight loss and demonstrates how when we use behavioral strategies – known as commitment devices – we change the game of weight loss. While obesity is arguably the largest health problem our nation faces today, it is not a problem that is exclusive to those who suffer weight gain. For therapists and counselors who work with those who wish to lose weight, there is ample information about diet and exercise; however, one very large problem remains. How do therapists get their clients to use this information? Packed with exercises therapists can use with their clients to increase self-control, resist impulses, improve decision making and harness accountability, this course will not just provide therapists with the tools they need to help their clients change the way they think about weight loss, but ultimately, the outcome they arrive at. Course #21-13 | 2016 | 31 pages | 15 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion.

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

Depression & Alcohol Don’t Mix

24 Jul

By Marcus Clarke @psysci

7 Reasons Drinking Will Only Make Things Worse

Depression & Alcohol Don't MixThere have been songs written about it.  Relationships have begun, and ended, under it’s influence. We have some when we are happy, and when we are sad. There have even been, in the case of Dionysus, religious figures worshiped because of their connection with it. What is it? Yes, you’ve guessed it: alcohol.

Though we tend to associated alcohol with having a good time, and science backs this up, with research showing that alcohol stimulates dopamine neurons on the reward pathway, and opioid cells that release endorphins, there is a limit. After a certain amount of alcohol, it is speculated that it is about 0.05% blood alcohol level, this is no longer the case.

Your mood will drop, and things will go downhill. Though it is common for people who are depressed to use alcohol to make them feel better, and even to rely on it to get through the day, the negative effects will only be exacerbated in those with depression. Why is this? Below are seven reasons why drinking will only make your depression worse.

1. People who drink are more likely to harm themselves

According to the Royal College of Psychiatrists, self-harm and suicide are much more common in those with a drinking problem. This is further supported by the National Institute of Health, who claim “Alcohol abuse may lead to suicidality through disinhibition, impulsiveness and impaired judgment, but it may also be used as a means to ease the distress associated with committing an act of suicide.” So it may reduce inhibitions and allow someone to cope with the pain they go through as they contemplate suicide. These facts are both pretty compelling reasons for giving up drinking.

2. Could drinking be the cause of your depression?

According to the APA, Drinking problems also have a very negative impact on mental health. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism can worsen existing conditions such as depression or induce new problems such as serious memory loss, depression or anxiety.

Alcohol problems don’t just hurt the drinker. Spouses and children of heavy drinkers may face family violence; children may suffer physical and sexual abuse and neglect and develop psychological problems. Women who drink during pregnancy run a serious risk of damaging their fetuses. Relatives, friends and strangers can be injured or killed in alcohol-related accidents and assaults.

For example, Science Daily outlines a 30-year study of 400 men. Nearly 50% had a genetic predisposition towards alcoholism. Over a number of decades, almost half of the men with fathers who were alcoholics developed problems with alcohol, with one fifth suffering a bout of major depression.

3. Alcohol can exacerbate your symptoms

Though you may think a drink will make you feel better, and it may, transiently, it will actually make your symptoms worse in both the long and short term. Alcohol changes brain chemistry, which can make you more depressed. As well as this, hangovers increase feelings anxiety, worry and guilt. Also, alcohol consumption can affect your life in other ways: you may find yourself having arguments with family, quarreling about your drinking and you may make poor decisions under the influence. This will only make you feel more depressed.

4. Alcohol can increase Risky Behavior

In addition to exacerbating depression symptoms, alcohol increases impulsivity, decreases inhibitions and impairs judgment, so you’re essentially not thinking straight — or like yourself. You’re unable to make informed and rational decisions. This can put you in dangerous situations and lead you to do things that you later regret which only serves to deepen depression symptoms.

5. Alcohol affects your health in other ways, which will prevent you getting over your depression

As well as the effects on your mental health, alcohol can affect your physical health in many ways. The National Institute of Health lists a dizzying array of disorders, including cirrhosis, many cancers and heart problems that can be caused or made worse by drinking. Of course, if you are unhealthy, this will make you feel worse, and will make it harder for you to fight your depression. Also, there is a correlation between adequate nutrition, including getting the correct vitamins and minerals, and mood.

6. Alcohol can lead to other mental health problems in addition to your depression, such as anxiety and serious memory loss

According to the APA alcohol abuse and alcoholism can worsen existing conditions such as depression. Also, it can create new problems such as serious memory loss and anxiety. As you know, depression is hard enough to cope with, and you do not want to add another disorder to the things you have to cope with.

7. It’s a vicious circle

With depression and anxiety, it’s a chicken or egg situation. Even the scientific evidence is unclear on whether alcohol causes depression, or whether depression will cause you to drink more. In fact, the reality is almost certainly much more complex. However, one thing is clear: if you stop drinking, your symptoms will probably improve, and perhaps go away completely.

Given this, the evidence is sobering (ahem). There are many reasons why if you are depressed, you should give up the drink. Drinking will only worsen your mental health issues and, according to some studies, abstinence may actually eliminate your depression.

Marcus regularly blogs at psysci, a psychology, science blog that examines the latest research and explains how findings can impact and improve people’s lives.

Related Online Continuing Education (CE) Courses:

Depression is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that provides an introduction to the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of depressive illness. Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad. But these feelings are usually short-lived and pass within a couple of days. When you have depression, it interferes with daily life and causes pain for both you and those who care about you. Depression is a common but serious illness. Many people with a depressive illness never seek treatment. But the majority, even those with the most severe depression, can get better with treatment. Medications, psychotherapies, and other methods can effectively treat people with depression. Some types of depression tend to run in families. However, depression can occur in people without family histories of depression too. Scientists are studying certain genes that may make some people more prone to depression. Some genetics research indicates that risk for depression results from the influence of several genes acting together with environmental or other factors. In addition, trauma, loss of a loved one, a difficult relationship, or any stressful situation may trigger a depressive episode. Other depressive episodes may occur with or without an obvious trigger. This introductory course provides an overview to the various forms of depression, including signs and symptoms, co-existing conditions, causes, gender and age differences, and diagnosis and treatment options. Closeout course #10-72 | 2014 | 14 pages | 10 posttest questions

Clergy Stress and Depression is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE) course that provides clinicians with an understanding of the complex factors that cause stress and depression in clergy, along with recommendations for prevention and treatment. According to the Schaeffer Institute, the ministry is perhaps the single most stressful and frustrating working profession, more than medical, legal, or political careers. Most statistics say that 60% to 80% of those who enter the ministry will not still be in it 10 years later, and only a fraction will stay in it as a lifetime career. One study found that over 70% of pastors are so stressed and burned out that they regularly consider leaving the ministry. What are the elements that conspire to produce such dire statistics? In addition to the job stressors that will be discussed in this course, the essential rub may be found in the daunting challenges of trying to accommodate two entities – the human being and the minister – within a single skin. Clergy stress and its links to depression have been identified in numerous studies and dissertations. However, the authors believe little research has been done linking the internal, external, and spiritual factors that are involved in stress and depression in clergy. This course, which is an adaptation of a doctoral dissertation, proposes to examine the role of these three factors in clergy stress and depression from a Judeo-Christian foundation, which would include Jewish rabbis, Catholic priests, and Protestant pastors. It is likely that most mental health professionals will encounter clergy among the clients they treat in their practices. Course #40-32 | 2013 | 52 pages | 30 posttest questions

Nutrition and Addiction: Advanced Clinical Concepts is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines addiction from a nutritional perspective. Drug addiction is an alarming problem in America, and one that is not receiving the treatment it needs. Compounding the problem is that addiction often leads to nutritional deficiencies, which predisposes the addict to a host of related health complications. Treatment recovery programs that also offer nutritional education have been found to significantly improve three-month sobriety success rates. The first section of this course will take a look at the etiology of addiction, related neurochemical factors and physiological components. The second section will focus on the nutrient deficiencies associated with addiction, along with the resultant effects on mood, cognition and behavior. The last section – the clinician’s toolbox – will give you, the clinician, targeted nutritional interventions and exercises that you can use with your clients to not just improve their recovery rates, but their overall mental health and wellbeing. Course #21-14 | 2017 | 30 pages | 15 posttest questions

Nutrition and Mental Health: Advanced Clinical Concepts is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that examines how what we eat influences how we feel, both physically and mentally. While the role of adequate nutrition in maintaining mental health has been established for some time, just how clinicians go about providing the right nutritional information to the patient at the right time – to not just ensure good mental health, but actually optimize mood – has not been so clear. With myriad diets, weight loss supplements and programs, clients often find themselves reaching for the next best nutritional solution, all the while, unsure how they will feel, or even what to eat to feel better. On the other side of the equation, clinicians so often face not just a client’s emotional, situational, and relational concerns, but concerns that are clearly mired in how the client feels physically, and what impact his/her nutritional health may have on these concerns. For example, research into the role of blood sugar levels has demonstrated a clear crossover with client impulse control. Additionally, the gut microbiome, and its role in serotonin production and regulation has consistently made clear that without good gut health, mitigating anxiety and depression becomes close to impossible. So if good mental health begins with good nutritional health, where should clinicians start? What advice should they give to a depressed client? An anxious client? A client with impulse control problems? This course will answer these questions and more. Comprised of three sections, the course will begin with an overview of macronutrient intake and mental health, examining recent popular movements such as intermittent fasting, carb cycling and ketogenic diets, and their impact on mental health. In section two, we will look specifically at the role of blood sugar on mental health, and research that implicates blood sugar as both an emotional and behavioral regulator. Gut health, and specifically the gut microbiome, and its influence on mood and behavior will then be explored. Lastly, specific diagnoses and the way they are impacted by specific vitamins and minerals will be considered. Section three will deliver specific tools, you, the clinician, can use with your clients to assess, improve and maximize nutrition to optimize mental health. Course #11-06 | 2017 | 21 pages | 10 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within one week of completion).

 

 

Closeout Sale – 50% Off Online CE Courses

26 Jun

Closeout CE Sale @pdresources.org

Our annual Closeout Sale is here, where you can save 50% on CE courses slated for retirement. But don’t worry, you’ll still have *3 years to complete for credit! (*Course expiration date varies by profession – for everyone except SLPs, you have 3 years to complete. SLPs must complete courses by the designated ASHA expiration date.)

Here are a handful of our newly added Closeout Courses:

DepressionDepression is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that provides an introduction to the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of depressive illness. Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad. But these feelings are usually short-lived and pass within a couple of days. When you have depression, it interferes with daily life and causes pain for both you and those who care about you. Depression is a common but serious illness. Many people with a depressive illness never seek treatment. But the majority, even those with the most severe depression, can get better with treatment. Medications, psychotherapies, and other methods can effectively treat people with depression. Some types of depression tend to run in families. However, depression can occur in people without family histories of depression too. Scientists are studying certain genes that may make some people more prone to depression. Some genetics research indicates that risk for depression results from the influence of several genes acting together with environmental or other factors. In addition, trauma, loss of a loved one, a difficult relationship, or any stressful situation may trigger a depressive episode. Other depressive episodes may occur with or without an obvious trigger. This introductory course provides an overview to the various forms of depression, including signs and symptoms, co-existing conditions, causes, gender and age differences, and diagnosis and treatment options. Closeout course #10-72 | 2014 | 14 pages | 10 posttest questions

Ten Reasons Not to Worry (Too Much) About Malpractice ClaimsTen Reasons Not to Worry (Too Much) About Malpractice Claims is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that will enable therapists to become clear about the legal definition of malpractice and what it means for them. Using the data available and the opinions of experts – researchers, clinicians, and especially plaintiffs’ attorneys – the author presents ten reasons why the risk of a malpractice claim and its consequences are really not very high. Interspersed throughout are ethical points and risk management tips that enable therapists to adhere to very high standards of care, which add up to the best defense against malpractice worries. This course also addresses some cognitive sets that can cause unwarranted worry and attempts to offer more realistic perceptions on the motivations of clients who sue and those who tend to be litigious. Although suits are improbable, they can happen and are exceptionally distressing and disrupting to professionals. The final section summarizes ways therapists can employ the best ethical practices to prevent lawsuits and use therapeutic skills to manage them when they happen. Closeout course #10-64 | 2013 | 22 pages | 10 posttest questions

Forensic PsychologyForensic Psychology is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that addresses a variety of forensic psychology topics in the form of 9 archived articles from The National Psychologist. Topics include:

  • Creating a forensic subspecialty
  • Veterans treatment courts quickly expanded
  • Providing mental health services in corrections
  • Mental health again is issue in gun control debate
  • Florida adopts Daubert standard for expert testimony
  • Ethics, psychology and the prison mess
  • Forensic psychology IS a specialty
  • The violence carousel keeps going around and around
  • Forensic opportunities abound.


This course is intended for psychotherapists of all specialties. Closeout course #10-73 | 2014 | 16 pages | 8 posttest questions

Lewy Body DementiaLewy Body Dementia: Information for Patients, Families, and Professionals is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that explains what is known about the different types of LBD and how they are diagnosed. Most importantly, it describes how to treat and manage this difficult disease, with practical advice for both people with LBD and their caregivers. Lewy body dementia (LBD) is a disease associated with abnormal deposits of a protein called alpha-synuclein in the brain. These deposits, called Lewy bodies, affect chemicals in the brain whose changes, in turn, can lead to problems with thinking, movement, behavior, and mood. LBD is one of the most common causes of dementia, after Alzheimer’s disease and vascular disease. Dementia is a severe loss of thinking abilities that interferes with a person’s capacity to perform daily activities such as household tasks, personal care, and handling finances. Dementia has many possible causes, including stroke, tumor, depression, and vitamin deficiency, as well as disorders such as LBD, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s. Diagnosing LBD can be challenging for a number of reasons. Early LBD symptoms are often confused with similar symptoms found in brain diseases like Alzheimer’s. Also, LBD can occur alone or along with Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease. This course is intended to help people with LBD, their families, and professionals learn more about the disease and resources for coping. It explains what is known about the different types of LBD and how they are diagnosed. Most importantly, it describes how to treat and manage this difficult disease, with practical advice for both people with LBD and their caregivers. Closeout course #10-76 | 2013 | 21 pages | 10 posttest questions

Bipolar Disorder in Children and AdolescentsBipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that describes the symptoms and treatments for bipolar disorder (BPD) in children and adolescents. All parents can relate to the many changes their children go through as they grow up. But sometimes it’s hard to tell if a child is just going through a “phase,” or showing signs of something more serious. In the last decade, the number of children receiving the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, sometimes, called manic-depressive illness, has grown substantially. But what does the diagnosis really mean for a child? This course discusses bipolar disorder in children and teens, including signs and symptoms, differences between child/adolescent and adult BPD, diagnostic types, medications for BPD (along with their individual cautions), and other therapies. Closeout course #10-68 | 2012 | 24 pages | 10 posttest questions

Bipolar Disorder in AdultsBipolar Disorder in Adults is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that provides a brief overview of the signs and symptoms, diagnostic considerations and treatment options for BPD in adults. Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out daily tasks. Symptoms of bipolar disorder can be severe. They are different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through from time to time. Bipolar disorder symptoms can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. But bipolar disorder can be treated, and people with this illness can lead full and productive lives. This introductory course, from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), provides a brief overview of bipolar disorder in adults, including: signs and symptoms; diagnosis; risk factors; and treatment options. Closeout course #10-92 | 2012 | 28 pages | 10 posttest questions

Biology of AgingBiology of Aging: Research Today for a Healthier Tomorrow is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews the research on aging and provides insight into where the science is heading. What is aging? Can we live long and live well—and are they the same thing? Is aging in our genes? How does our metabolism relate to aging? Can your immune system still defend you as you age? Since the National Institute on Aging was established in 1974, scientists asking just such questions have learned a great deal about the processes associated with the biology of aging. Technology today supports research that years ago would have seemed possible only in a science fiction novel. This course introduces some key areas of research into the biology of aging. Each area is a part of a larger field of scientific inquiry. You can look at each topic individually, or you can step back to see how they fit together, interwoven to help us better understand aging processes. Research on aging is dynamic, constantly evolving based on new discoveries, and so this course also looks ahead to the future, as today’s research provides the strongest hints of things to come. Closeout course #20-85 | 2012 | 30 pages | 15 posttest questions

Celiac Disease: Basics & BeyondCeliac Disease: Basics & Beyond is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that explains the basics of celiac disease from prevalence and pathophysiology to diagnosis and management. It also goes beyond the basics by including the dietary treatment of celiac disease from a registered dietitian’s perspective by outlining the steps of the nutrition care process from assessment to monitoring and evaluation. Two case studies are included to assist the health professional in understanding the patient’s perspective from pre-diagnosis to disease management. This course will be informative for anyone with celiac disease as well as registered dietitians and other health professionals who work with patients with celiac disease. Closeout course #20-76 | 2013 | 26 pages | 17 posttest questions

More courses available @pdresources.org!

All offers valid on future orders only. You will have up to 3 years from date of purchase to complete your courses, so feel free to stock up and save. The day you complete your online course test and evaluation is the date that will appear on your certificate of completion.

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within one week of completion).

 

Effects of Digital Media on Children

15 Jun

Course excerpt from Effects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and Learning

Television became a hot topic of discussion in the 1950s, and even more so as children’s programming became available. Family’s lives were forever changed as their youngsters began to cluster on the floor and sit mesmerized in front of the heavy console piece of furniture with the flickering black and white picture. Programming for children seemed to be a ready-made helpmate to the parents who needed distractions, for many mothers while they went about house chores, especially when the weather made it prohibitive to send the kids outside to play. In fact, the houses with a family fortunate enough to have a television quickly became the youngsters’ favorite home on the block. In fairness to the youth, adult television shows were just as intriguing to the parents.

Televised news, variety shows, dramatic stories, and early game shows soon gave way to a myriad of sports shows, animal documentaries, and even singing shows; Baby Boomers likely remember “Mitch Miller” directing us to watch the bouncing ball so that we could all sing along from the comfort of our living rooms. Whether we mark the beginning of media use with the silent, then “talkie,” movies shown in theaters, or the introduction of television to the intimacy of our homes, media technology has been affecting the lives of humans for several decades. More recently, with the advent of lap top computers, smart phones and tablets, digital technology is a hot topic and area of concern for many parents, teachers, and healthcare practitioners.

Effects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and LearningTo use one of the newer phrases in our techno-influenced vocabularies, “fast forward” to the second decade of the twenty-first century and we are now surrounded by media technology ranging from small sized that will fit into our hands, to wall mounted screens that support life-size images. These screens portray a wide range of content, from televised humans in dramatic stories, to cartoon/ animated figures in entertainment programs or video games. The location of technology in our homes has increased at a dizzying speed, and several research surveys will be presented in this course to identify the extent to which technology has infiltrated daily lives.

Rarely does a home have only one television in the living room- many have TV sets in bedrooms, living rooms, and even kitchens. Entertainment rooms have been replaced with mobile devices that enable us to take our smart phones, tablets, or laptop computers with us wherever we go. Many homes have multiple media screen monitors so that some may be dedicated to video games, while others are used with computers. The movement toward the use of tablets in homes, preschools, and both primary- and secondary-schools is reaching its highest level of use to-date. The combined use of e-readers, tablets, and laptop computers has changed the everyday life of students who may no longer use textbooks for homework or in-class learning activities.

Whether you’re a person who rushes out to buy every new piece of technology as soon as it hits the market or one who scratches their head over the way it seems that everyone is carrying a smart phone and looking at their phone instead of the world around them, digital media is a part of our lives. Researchers in psychology, pediatric medicine, nursing, counseling, social work, speech-language pathology and other related professions are attempting to identify exactly how digital technology is changing our society. There is no doubt that technology is shaping our world in many ways, even if we don’t actively use the internet or use our phones to text.

We cannot escape ubiquitous smartphones being used by people walking on the street without looking at their surroundings, sitting in sports arenas and missing the live action of the sport occurring in front of them, and unfortunately, by drivers of cars on the streets on which we travel. There is absolutely no doubt that texting while driving is criminally, and often fatally, dangerous. But, there are other areas where the dangers may not be as apparent.

Is it possible that the ever increasing use of technology and media by young children is not good for a child’s development? Early childhood educators are involved in research to help us answer that question. Do we really know that using tablets and laptops in our classrooms is more effective than teacher-directed learning? Teachers and education specialists are re-examining the school settings in which this has already changed the model of teaching. Is note taking on a keyboard more helpful for learning than using a pen or pencil to write down notes during a teacher’s lecture? Some research suggests that writing notes supports more effective learning than taking notes on a keyboard device.

Effects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and LearningEffects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and Learning is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews the research on media use and offers guidance for educators and parents to regulate their children’s use of digital devices. Today’s world is filled with smartphones used by people ignoring their surroundings and even texting while driving, which is criminally dangerous. Are there other dangers that may not be as apparent? Media technology (e.g., smart phones, tablets, or laptop computers) have changed the world. Babies and children are affected and research reveals that 46% of children under age one, and up to 59% of eight-year-old children are exposed to cell phones. In England, nearly 80% of senior primary-school staff reportedly are worried about poor social skills or speech problems of children entering school, which they attribute to the use of media devices. Media technology affects family life, children’s readiness for entering school or preschool, and classroom learning. Recent research delineates a developmental progression of understanding information on devices for children between ages 2- 5 years. Younger children may believe false information if it is on a computer. This research is important for understanding technology uses in education. There are also known health risks and possible adverse effects to social-emotional development. Statistics describing the increase of media technology and developing trends in media use are presented along with guidelines and position statements developed to protect children from risks and adverse effects. Course #30-96 | 2017 | 50 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

About the Author:

Janet Harrison, PhD, CCC-SLP, has been an Associate Professor and Director of Clinical Education in Speech-Language Pathology at Purdue University, an Associate Professor at Marshall University and an Assistant Professor at Valdosta State University. Prior to her university positions she was Administrative Director of Clinical Services, Devereux Hospital & Neurobehavioral Institute of Texas, and developed a clinical program as the director of the Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Devereux Hospital & Children’s Center of Florida. Dr. Harrison has worked extensively in both medical and educational settings for intervention with children and adolescents who have language disorders as well as emotional/behavioral disorders.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

The Importance of Social Skills

31 May

Course excerpt from Improving Social Skills in Children & Adolescents

Improving Social Skills in Children & AdolescentsEveryone wants to be wanted and needed; feelings of belonging are crucial for a person’s self-esteem. Children who are socially competent instinctively understand how relationships work. They can process social data and have a collection of behavioral tools at their disposal to help them in the social arena. These children have good relationships with their peers and the adults in their lives, and they are generally happier, resilient and emotionally healthy.

What are social skills? These are essentially the skills that are needed for successful social communication and interaction across a variety of settings and involve the ability to interact with other individuals in a congenial and harmonious manner. A variety of definitions have been offered. Social skills, as defined by Cillessen and Bellmore (2011), involve being prosocial and cooperative, and being interpersonally successful.

Khadi et al. (2015) included such social activities as showing sympathy for others when they are sad, apologizing if he or she hurts the feelings of others, greeting other children, and responding appropriately when introduced to others.

Social competence, as described by Green & Wood (2014) is characterized by achievement and maintenance of satisfying social relationships.

According to Güven et al. (2015, p. 56), social skills are “closely linked to development and are perhaps the most important set of abilities a person can have.” They include:

  • Showing interest in others
  • Giving and receiving
  • Asserting our needs and rights in appropriate ways
  • Showing consideration and sympathy
  • Communicating effectively


Unfortunately, people are not born with these skills, although some individuals learn them more readily than others. Learning how to get along with others is a process that begins at a very early stage and continues throughout life. The process can be seriously disrupted for children who have other developmental or learning difficulties, which can impair natural social learning processes. It is imperative that professionals working with children know how to help kids develop these life affirming social skills.

Improving Social Skills in Children & AdolescentsImproving Social Skills in Children & Adolescents is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses the social skills children and adolescents will need to develop to be successful in school and beyond. It will demonstrate the challenges and difficulties that arise from a deficit of these crucial skills, as well as the benefits and advantages that can come about with well-developed social skills. This course will also provide practical tools that teachers and therapists can employ to guide children to overcome their difficulties in the social realm and gain social competence. While there are hundreds of important social skills for students to learn, we can organize them into skill areas to make it easier to identify and determine appropriate interventions. This course is divided into 10 chapters, each detailing various aspects of social skills that children, teens, and adults must master to have normative, healthy relationships with the people they encounter every day. This course provides tools and suggestions that, with practice and support, can assist them in managing their social skills deficits to function in society and nurture relationships with the peers and adults in their lives. Course #40-40 | 2016 | 62 pages | 35 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Happy children image created by Pressfoto – Freepik.com

 

Memorial Weekend Sale – Buy 2 CE, Get 1 FREE!

25 May

Memorial Weekend Sale @pdresources.org

Celebrate and honor our fallen soldiers and kick-off the start of summer during our Memorial Weekend Sale – Buy Any 2 Courses and Get 1 FREE!

Memorial Weekend CE Sale

Have a coupon? Apply it at checkout for even greater savings > Shop now!

Choose any 3 CE courses and the lowest priced 3rd course will automatically deduct at checkout (courses must be purchased together, one free course per order). Memorial Weekend Sale ends Wednesday, May 31, 2017. Offer valid on future orders only.

OCD
Effects of Digital Media
Ethics   Boundaries
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Ethics
Executive Functioning
Preventing Medical Errors
Show All Courses
Nutrition and Addiction
Gender Identity
Clinical Supervision
Show All Courses
Ethics for OTs
Improving Social Skills
Animal-Assisted Therapy
Show All Courses
Domestic Violence
Codependency
Cultural Competence
Show All Courses
Nutrition for Eating Disorders
Ethics for RDNs
Nutrition and Mental Health
Show All Courses
Anxiety in Children
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Cyberbullying
Show All Courses

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. Our purpose is to provide high quality online continuing education (CE) courses on topics relevant to members of the healthcare professions we serve. We strive to keep our carbon footprint small by being completely paperless, allowing telecommuting, recycling, using energy-efficient lights and powering off electronics when not in use. We provide online CE courses to allow our colleagues to earn credits from the comfort of their own home or office so we can all be as green as possible (no paper, no shipping or handling, no travel expenses, etc.). Sustainability isn’t part of our work – it’s a guiding influence for all of our work.

We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within one week of completion).