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Applied Behavior Analysis for Autism

21 Jun

New Online Continuing Education Course @pdresources.org

Applied Behavior Analysis for AutismApplied Behavior Analysis for Autism is a new 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides evidence-based behavioral interventions for the minimally verbal child with autism.

The prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) currently seems to be holding steady at one in 68 children (or 1.46 percent). The communication challenges of these children are widely known and require specialized early interventions to overcome them.

This course presents evidence-based strategies that can enable students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and others who are verbally limited, to become more effective communicators. The focus will be on the minimally verbal child, the child who has a very small repertoire of spoken words or fixed phrases that are used communicatively. Included are an overview of autism spectrum disorder, an introduction to the science of applied behavior analysis, the use of manding in communication training, techniques for direct instruction programming, and inter-professional collaboration strategies. Major points are illustrated throughout by case studies from actual practice. Course #21-15 | 2017 | 43 pages | 15 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

About the Author:

Rosemarie Griffin, MA, CCC-SLP, BCBA, COBA, is licensed by the Ohio Board of Speech Pathology and Audiology and the Ohio Department of Education, and is a certified member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). She is also licensed by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) and by the Ohio Board of Psychology. She completed her Master’s degree at Kent State University, her education specialist degree in school administration from Cleveland State University and coursework leading to licensure as a board certified behavior analyst from the University of North Texas. To learn more about modified leisure skills or to gather information about using applied behavior analysis to help students increase their communication skills, check out her website www.abaspeech.org.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

Advantages of E-Therapy

20 Jun

Course excerpt from E-Therapy: Ethics & Best Practices

E-therapy benefitsE-therapy (a.k.a. distance therapy, telepsychology, telemental health, remote therapy, etc.) refers to the delivery of mental health services in which electronic equipment and therapeutic communication converge online. Typically the online services include emails, discussion lists, chats, or audiovisual conferencing. This kind of therapy is proliferating rapidly, and its applications have the potential to advance the field of mental health in a multitude of ways.

Research suggests that e-therapy may have similar or, in some cases, even better therapeutic benefits than face-to-face (F2F) therapy. Studies have also suggested that e-therapy for certain purposes can be very cost-effective because it can require minimal or no therapist involvement. However, (good news for all of us?) therapist involvement is still generally preferred.

In their article on home-based telemental health (HBTMH), Pruitt and Luxton (2014) state that “one of the principle benefits of HBTMH is its potential to improve treatment attendance and satisfaction, which can lead to more positive treatment outcomes. The benefits of reduced travel, less time off work, shorter appointment wait-times, and greater personal control are frequently cited as advantages of telehealth-based care over in-person care.”

Patients with Limited Mobility

The main advantage of e-therapy is that it can reach people who might not otherwise seek therapy, such as disabled people or those who live in remote areas; it also reduces the contact time between therapist and patient.

A Sense of Anonymity

It has been observed that online interactions can differ from in-person encounters in that the former imparts a sense of disconnect or anonymity. This phenomenon has been referred to as the “online disinhibition effect.” This is essentially the observation that while online, some people self-disclose or act out more frequently or intensely than they would in person. A positive aspect of this effect – in the context of remote online therapy – is that some individuals may be inclined to disclose information they might not be disposed to share in a traditional therapy session.

Bypassing the Stigma

According to Luxton et al. (2012), “Home-based TMH is a viable solution to provide improved access to quality mental healthcare for those unable or unwilling to seek traditional care because of mobility, geography, or concerns about stigma.”

Even in current times, when it is fairly commonplace for individuals to seek psychotherapy for life’s issues, there is still some residual stigma associated with psychotherapy – at least in the minds of some individuals. Particularly in small communities or certain occupational spheres like the armed services and police departments, it is not unusual for everyone to know everyone else’s business. This concern may play a role in the decision of some not to avail themselves of therapeutic resources, even when they are in need and even when such resources are otherwise available and affordable.

Where therapy offices and waiting rooms are visible to others, concerns about privacy can be a significant issue. In rural areas or small towns, or even in some areas of larger cities, it is not uncommon for patients to encounter people they know in clinical waiting rooms. Patients who forgo seeking treatment due to such privacy concerns may be willing to participate in care if it is provided in a private place such as their own home.

Click here to learn more.

E-Therapy: Ethics & Best PracticesE-Therapy: Ethics & Best Practices is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines the advantages, risks, technical issues, legalities and ethics of providing therapy online. E-therapy can be used to address age-old problems, such as how to reach out to those who might not otherwise avail themselves of psychotherapy services even though they are in acute need. At the same time, it is clear that many providers have embraced the new technologies without a firm grasp on the new and serious vulnerabilities that are introduced when their patients’ personal health information goes online. Included in this course are sections on video therapy, email, text messaging, smart phone use, social media, cloud storage, Skype, and other telecommunications services. This course is focused upon the ethical principles that are called into play with the use of e-therapy. Among them the most obvious concern is for privacy and confidentiality. Yet these are not the only ethical principles that will be challenged by the increasing use of e-therapy. The others include interjurisdictional issues (crossing state lines), informed consent, competence and scope of practice, boundaries and multiple relationships, and record keeping. In addition to outlining potential ethical problems and HIPAA challenges, this course includes recommended resources and sets of specific guidelines and best practices that have been established and published by various professional organizations. Course #30-87 | 2016 | 52 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

About the Author:

Leo Christie, PhD, LMFT, is a Florida-licensed Marriage and Family Therapist with a doctorate in Marriage and Family Therapy from Florida State University. Past President of the Florida Council on Family Relations, Dr. Christie is currently CEO of Professional Development Resources, a nonprofit corporation whose mission is to deliver continuing education credit courses to healthcare professionals throughout the United States. He has more than 20 years’ experience in private practice with a specialty in child behavior disorders and as an instructor for over 500 live continuing education seminars for healthcare professionals.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046, ACE Program); the Florida Boards of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (#BAP346) and Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

Perfectionism: A Suicide Predictor

19 Jun

Course excerpt from Suicide Prevention: Evidence-Based Strategies

PerfectionismOne of the intriguing risk factors for suicide from recent research is perfectionism. In a literature review, Flett, Hewitt, and Heisel (2014) report consistent evidence linking suicide ideation with long-term exposure to a source of external pressure to be perfect. Perfectionism has been shown to predict suicide above the predictor of hopelessness. Perfectionism coupled with self-concealment (not allowing others to see one’s faults) is a risk for suicide without warning. The authors also note the risk for perfectionists for life stress, hopelessness, and overgeneralization.

The risk for perfectionists is that the person’s emotional perfectionism does not allow for disclosure of suicidal thoughts. Flett and colleagues warn behavioral health professionals to “beware the mask” of people who hide their distress until they kill themselves. Self-concealment and silencing the self – not allowing oneself to admit to distress – are perfectionistic traits which can lead inexorably to suicide. This suicide risk is high because the person will avoid seeking any kind of help, whether the help is from family, friends, or professionals.

The pressure to be perfect may come from a parent, an employer, spouse, or other significant person. This might include a hypercritical parent, a workplace that does not tolerate any mistakes, or a romantic partner who seemingly cannot be pleased. Flett and colleagues list the dimensions of perfectionism from research: high personal standards, doubts about one’s actions, high expectations of parents, and high criticism from parents. The perfectionist has a feeling of continually falling short of their own and others’ standards. This leads to other key risk factors for suicide: the perception of being a burden and thwarted needs for belonging.

A study found a significant suicide potential in children and adolescents with perfectionist traits. The study found evidence validating the perfectionism social disconnection model. This model states that interpersonal perfectionism creates a sense of isolation and alienation that increases suicide risk (Roxborough et al., 2012). The researchers found the link between suicide potential and the need to seem perfect to others was accompanied by a history of high interpersonal hopelessness and being bullied.

Click here to learn more.

Suicide Prevention: Evidence-Based StrategiesSuicide Prevention: Evidence-Based Strategies is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that reviews evidence-based research and offers strategies for screening, assessment, treatment, and prevention of suicide in both adolescents and adults. Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. In 2015, 44,193 people killed themselves. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes, “Suicide is a serious but preventable public health problem that can have lasting harmful effects on individuals, families, and communities.” People who attempt suicide but do not die face potentially serious injury or disability, depending on the method used in the attempt. Depression and other mental health issues follow the suicide attempt. Family, friends, and coworkers are negatively affected by suicide. Shock, anger, guilt, and depression arise in the wake of this violent event. Even the community as a whole is affected by the loss of a productive member of society, lost wages not spent at local businesses, and medical costs. The CDC estimates that suicides result in over 44 billion dollars in work loss and medical costs. Prevention is key: reducing risk factors and promoting resilience. This course will provide a review of evidence-based studies on this complex subject for psychologists, marriage & family therapists, professional counselors, and social workers. Information from the suicide prevention technical package from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be provided. Included also are strategies for screening and assessment, prevention considerations, methods of treatment, and resources for choosing evidence-based suicide prevention programs. Course #30-97 | 2017 | 60 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

About the Author:

Laura More, MSW, LCSW, is a healthcare author and licensed clinical social worker. Laura was one of the founding partners of Care2Learn, a provider of online continuing education courses for the post-acute healthcare industry. She now provides healthcare authoring services. She has authored over 120 online continuing education titles, co-authored evidence-based care assessment area resources and a book, The Licensed Practical Nurse in Long-term Care Field Guide. She is the recipient of the 2010 Education Award from the American College of Health Care Administrators.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

What is OCD?

16 Jun

Course excerpt from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

“What if . . . . . ?” “What if I left the coffee pot on?” “What if I made the wrong decision and someone gets hurt?” Did these thoughts cause your heart to beat a little faster?

Did you go check the coffee pot or let the thought go? Did you change your mind when you doubted the choice you made?

OCDObsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is the doubting disease. The doubts never end. If you are treating a patient with OCD, before you know it, you are caught up in it. You hear the person obsessively analyzing hypothetical and catastrophic outcomes and you are made to think of the infinite minutiae of how germs and safety issues could possibly ruin people’s lives. You may try to reason with his/her irrational thoughts, but it won’t work. The truth is: anything is possible. Germs do cause illness, but those without OCD handle and touch things without a thought about whom else has handled them and what they might have left on them. Even though car accidents happen on a daily basis, we drive ourselves to where we need to go anyway. That is why when you are listening to a person’s symptoms, it is crucial to understand that the content of obsessions is not important. Obsessions can even change from time to time, rendering what seemed to be so urgent then insignificant now. The common denominator of OCD is the doubt.

OCD can be characterized as a glitch in the brain’s frontal cortex, home of executive functioning. The executive function is responsible for cognitive processes such as planning, working memory, attention, making judgments and moral decisions, problem solving, verbal reasoning, inhibition, mental flexibility, task switching, and initiation and monitoring of actions. When functioning under normal circumstances, the brain sends messages to which physiological responses are appropriately activated. With OCD, however, urgent messages are sent under the same circumstances in which nothing is wrong or threatening but compel the person with OCD into action just to make sure. How does this happen?

Neurophysiologically, research shows that during an OCD episode, a specific neurocircuit gets stuck in an obsessive loop. While there is no actual evidence of imminent danger, the person’s orbital frontal cortex kicks into alert, like someone pulling a false fire alarm, which sets a loop in motion that compels him/her to find the fire and put it out. It starts with the cingulate gyrus and transmits to the striatum (caudate nucleus and putamen), then to the globus pallidus, on to the thalamus then back to the frontal cortex. Highly anxious and with a sense of urgency, the person checks all possible places for the fire that isn’t there, which only intensifies the obsessive need to keep checking. The problem is that there is no way to prove a negative. No matter how hard the person tries, there is no way to prove a negative and find something that isn’t there.

Click here to learn more.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews the diagnosis, assessment and treatment strategies for OCD. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is characterized by intrusive, unwanted, and anxiety-provoking thoughts, images, impulses and rituals that are performed to alleviate the accompanying distress. Because OCD is a heterogeneous disorder with several subtypes, assessing, diagnosing, and treating it can be challenging. Further, the presentation of varying symptoms may be considered to be OC Related Disorders. Being able to make differential diagnoses and treatment recommendations are essential in clinical work with the many patients that present with the spectrum of OC problems. Specific behavioral strategies have been developed and validated in the literature that target the various manifestations of OCD and related disorders. The first part of the course offers information on the neurobiology, diagnosis and assessment tools, including the various subtypes, and highlights important topics to be taken into consideration during the process. Emotional and cognitive factors are outlined that seem to play important roles in the diagnosis and the course of episodes. The next section is dedicated to describing the clinical factors of and differential aspects of the OC Related Disorders and their prevalence. A case study follows that outlines the precipitating events, assessment, and behavioral treatment of a college student who is struggling to maintain and overcome her OCD. The final section describes effective treatment and coping strategies and augmentations that help to maintain treatment gains. Course #30-95 | 2017 | 60 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

Effects of Digital Media on Children

15 Jun

Course excerpt from Effects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and Learning

Television became a hot topic of discussion in the 1950s, and even more so as children’s programming became available. Family’s lives were forever changed as their youngsters began to cluster on the floor and sit mesmerized in front of the heavy console piece of furniture with the flickering black and white picture. Programming for children seemed to be a ready-made helpmate to the parents who needed distractions, for many mothers while they went about house chores, especially when the weather made it prohibitive to send the kids outside to play. In fact, the houses with a family fortunate enough to have a television quickly became the youngsters’ favorite home on the block. In fairness to the youth, adult television shows were just as intriguing to the parents.

Televised news, variety shows, dramatic stories, and early game shows soon gave way to a myriad of sports shows, animal documentaries, and even singing shows; Baby Boomers likely remember “Mitch Miller” directing us to watch the bouncing ball so that we could all sing along from the comfort of our living rooms. Whether we mark the beginning of media use with the silent, then “talkie,” movies shown in theaters, or the introduction of television to the intimacy of our homes, media technology has been affecting the lives of humans for several decades. More recently, with the advent of lap top computers, smart phones and tablets, digital technology is a hot topic and area of concern for many parents, teachers, and healthcare practitioners.

Effects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and LearningTo use one of the newer phrases in our techno-influenced vocabularies, “fast forward” to the second decade of the twenty-first century and we are now surrounded by media technology ranging from small sized that will fit into our hands, to wall mounted screens that support life-size images. These screens portray a wide range of content, from televised humans in dramatic stories, to cartoon/ animated figures in entertainment programs or video games. The location of technology in our homes has increased at a dizzying speed, and several research surveys will be presented in this course to identify the extent to which technology has infiltrated daily lives.

Rarely does a home have only one television in the living room- many have TV sets in bedrooms, living rooms, and even kitchens. Entertainment rooms have been replaced with mobile devices that enable us to take our smart phones, tablets, or laptop computers with us wherever we go. Many homes have multiple media screen monitors so that some may be dedicated to video games, while others are used with computers. The movement toward the use of tablets in homes, preschools, and both primary- and secondary-schools is reaching its highest level of use to-date. The combined use of e-readers, tablets, and laptop computers has changed the everyday life of students who may no longer use textbooks for homework or in-class learning activities.

Whether you’re a person who rushes out to buy every new piece of technology as soon as it hits the market or one who scratches their head over the way it seems that everyone is carrying a smart phone and looking at their phone instead of the world around them, digital media is a part of our lives. Researchers in psychology, pediatric medicine, nursing, counseling, social work, speech-language pathology and other related professions are attempting to identify exactly how digital technology is changing our society. There is no doubt that technology is shaping our world in many ways, even if we don’t actively use the internet or use our phones to text.

We cannot escape ubiquitous smartphones being used by people walking on the street without looking at their surroundings, sitting in sports arenas and missing the live action of the sport occurring in front of them, and unfortunately, by drivers of cars on the streets on which we travel. There is absolutely no doubt that texting while driving is criminally, and often fatally, dangerous. But, there are other areas where the dangers may not be as apparent.

Is it possible that the ever increasing use of technology and media by young children is not good for a child’s development? Early childhood educators are involved in research to help us answer that question. Do we really know that using tablets and laptops in our classrooms is more effective than teacher-directed learning? Teachers and education specialists are re-examining the school settings in which this has already changed the model of teaching. Is note taking on a keyboard more helpful for learning than using a pen or pencil to write down notes during a teacher’s lecture? Some research suggests that writing notes supports more effective learning than taking notes on a keyboard device.

Effects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and LearningEffects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and Learning is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews the research on media use and offers guidance for educators and parents to regulate their children’s use of digital devices. Today’s world is filled with smartphones used by people ignoring their surroundings and even texting while driving, which is criminally dangerous. Are there other dangers that may not be as apparent? Media technology (e.g., smart phones, tablets, or laptop computers) have changed the world. Babies and children are affected and research reveals that 46% of children under age one, and up to 59% of eight-year-old children are exposed to cell phones. In England, nearly 80% of senior primary-school staff reportedly are worried about poor social skills or speech problems of children entering school, which they attribute to the use of media devices. Media technology affects family life, children’s readiness for entering school or preschool, and classroom learning. Recent research delineates a developmental progression of understanding information on devices for children between ages 2- 5 years. Younger children may believe false information if it is on a computer. This research is important for understanding technology uses in education. There are also known health risks and possible adverse effects to social-emotional development. Statistics describing the increase of media technology and developing trends in media use are presented along with guidelines and position statements developed to protect children from risks and adverse effects. Course #30-96 | 2017 | 50 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

About the Author:

Janet Harrison, PhD, CCC-SLP, has been an Associate Professor and Director of Clinical Education in Speech-Language Pathology at Purdue University, an Associate Professor at Marshall University and an Assistant Professor at Valdosta State University. Prior to her university positions she was Administrative Director of Clinical Services, Devereux Hospital & Neurobehavioral Institute of Texas, and developed a clinical program as the director of the Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Devereux Hospital & Children’s Center of Florida. Dr. Harrison has worked extensively in both medical and educational settings for intervention with children and adolescents who have language disorders as well as emotional/behavioral disorders.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

Unusual Psychosexual Syndromes

14 Jun

Course excerpt from Unusual Psychosexual Syndromes, Part 1: Koro, Autoerotic Asphyxia, and Necrophilia

Unusual Psychosexual SyndromesHuman behavior is fascinating, complex, and multi-determined. What someone does in any given instance is caused by an active combination of factors that are psychological, learned, biological, genetic, environmental, and occasionally instinctual. Our understanding of human behaviors is greater than our ability to predict them. Even so, that understanding is far from complete and the extant theoretical explanations are sometimes contradictory and nonscientific.

In general terms, human behavior can be classified as positive, negative, or neutral. A broader classification is to label a target behavior as normal or abnormal. The matter gets more confused when issues of legal and illegal behavior arise, wherein an illegal behavior may not be abnormal and an abnormal behavior may be quite legal.

We now have the latest iteration of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) (2013) which serves as the official classification system in the U.S. and many other countries. Mental health disciplines and health insurance companies accept this guidebook as the “bible” of the field.

This course will address three unusual psychosexual syndromes which typically receive scant or no attention in the latest DSM or most abnormal psychology textbooks. The three syndromes presented here are koro, autoerotic asphyxia, and necrophilia. These disorders of course, are relatively infrequent in occurrence, yet they are fascinating illustrations of the extreme forms that human sexual behavior can take.

Clinicians need to be familiar with the entire spectrum of disordered behavior that may potentially be presented by their clients and patients. We will focus primarily on the symptoms and descriptions of the syndromes and assume that therapists and counselors will determine the best treatments to invoke, as based on their own theoretical perspectives and training.

Click here to learn more.

Unusual Psychosexual Syndromes, Part 1: Koro, Autoerotic Asphyxia, and NecrophiliaUnusual Psychosexual Syndromes, Part 1: Koro, Autoerotic Asphyxia, and Necrophilia is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that presents three of the most unusual human sexual behavior disorders. Each syndrome is a relatively rare, yet extraordinarily intriguing pattern of behavior. These men and women have fashioned highly unorthodox means of gratifying their basic needs for love and attention. These syndromes are typically ignored or receive only mere mentions in most abnormal psychology textbooks. Yet, these individuals could very well appear in mental health professionals’ practices as inpatients or outpatients. They all have clear forensic implications as well. Each syndrome is presented with a full description of its typical symptoms, relevant case histories, brief theoretical descriptions from the psychodynamic and behavioral perspectives, and the recommended treatments according to the best available current knowledge. Course #30-74 | 2014 | 35 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

About the Author:

Louis R. Franzini, PhD, received his B.S. degree in Psychology from the University of Pittsburgh, his M.A. degree in Clinical Psychology at the University of Toledo, and his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Pittsburgh. He then completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Behavior Modification at the State University of New York at Stony Brook (now Stony Brook University). Following the postdoctoral program Dr. Franzini joined the Psychology Department at San Diego State University, where he spent his entire academic career. He retired as Emeritus Professor of Psychology. His international academic experience included appointments as Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-le-Neuve, Belgium and Senior Fellow in the School of Accountancy and Business, Human Resource and Quality Management Division at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Dr. Franzini is licensed as a psychologist in Florida and in California.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590);  the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Related Online CE Courses:

Unusual Psychosexual Syndromes, Part 2: Erotomania & Frottage is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that is part 2 in a series presenting five of the most unusual human sexual behavior disorders. Each syndrome is a relatively rare, yet extraordinarily intriguing pattern of behavior. These men and women have fashioned highly unorthodox means of gratifying their basic needs for love and attention. These syndromes are typically ignored or receive only mere mentions in most abnormal psychology textbooks. Yet, these individuals could very well appear in mental health professionals’ practices as inpatients or outpatients. They all have clear forensic implications as well. Erotomania and frottage are presented with a full description of typical symptoms, relevant case histories, brief theoretical descriptions from the psychodynamic and behavioral perspectives, and the recommended treatments according to the best available current knowledge. Course #20-93 | 2014 | 22 pages | 25 posttest questions

Unusual Paraphilias is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that will describe a variety of paraphilias and specific fetishes that you may encounter in your practice. A paraphilia involves stimulating sexual arousal in someone by an object or fantasy that for most people is commonplace and not sexually related, either directly or symbolically. What you will learn in this course is that there is a clear continuum of unusualness for paraphilias. There are some familiar ones and there are also very many paraphilias reported in the clinical literature which are indeed extremely unusual. This course will include discussions of the eight standard Paraphilic Disorders included in the DSM-5: 1) Voyeuristic Disorder, 2) Exhibitionistic Disorder, 3) Frotteuristic Disorder, 4) Sexual Masochism Disorder, 5) Sexual Sadism Disorder, 6) Pedophilic Disorder, 7) Fetishistic Disorder, and 8) Transvestic Disorders, as well as a number of additional paraphilias and specific fetishes, which are generally quite rare. Course #10-85 | 2015 | 15 pages | 6 posttest questions

Really Bizarre Sexual Behaviors is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that reviews a variety of infrequent and atypical sexual practices. The range of extant human behavior is truly extraordinary. But, the range of sexual behaviors is exponentially more so. Some are so infrequent and atypical that we call them “bizarre.” Such sexual practices may be described by some laypersons as “sick” or “abnormal.” Even some health care professionals may label such behaviors as “paraphilic” or “psychopathological” or a major behavior or personality disorder or as simply symptomatic of very serious emotional disturbances. This course is intended to familiarize clinicians with a variety of “really bizarre sexual behaviors” that they might at least occasionally encounter in their practices. Our discussion is limited to behaviors and fantasies occurring with a human partner of either sex who consents to participation without coercion. No animals or children are involved as sexual objects or partners. It is useful to be aware of what some people like to do sexually and the language typically used in the informal sexual underground. There is no need to engage in such practices personally or even to “experiment” with them to become sufficiently knowledgeable.  It is also important to know where to go to learn more. Finally, this course will suggest criteria on how to make the decision on whether to treat such behaviors. Society claims an interest in an individual’s intimate practices and may sometimes invoke the criminal justice system to enforce those interests. Thus, there are ethical implications about court mandated treatment programs for behaviors that are consensual and not harmful to anyone. Course #30-88 | 2016 | 41 pages | 26 posttest questions

Gender Identity and Transgenderism is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that reviews issues in the formation of gender identity and the possible resultant condition of transgenderism, formerly transsexuality. After viewing oneself as a human being, the most important aspect of our self-concept is that we are a male person or a female person. That is the very essence of our humanness and the most basic sense of who we are. To experience a conflict between our physical body and our concept of maleness or femaleness is the most fundamental existential distress imaginable. This course will discuss the ongoing distinction between sex and gender, causes and prevalence of transgenderism, harassment of transgender children, DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, theories of gender development, conversion therapy, modern medical and socio-psychological treatment of transgender patients, passing, and postsurgical relationships and therapy. Certain prominent transgenderists are discussed, and several autobiographies are referenced to further our understanding of the complex transgender life experiences. Finally, some examples of positive changes are presented, which increase the knowledge base for the professionals who see transgender patients in their practices, along with other nascent societal changes, which, in turn, can improve these patient’s lives. Course #30-91 | 2016 | 41 pages | 20 posttest questions

 

Social Skills Alleviate At-Risk Behavior

13 Jun

Course excerpt from Improving Social Skills in Children & Adolescents

Improving Social Skills in Children & AdolescentsChildren with social deficits are more likely to have behavioral problems (Leonard et al., 2011). Speech-language pathologists play a crucial role in supporting parents and teachers with the design and implementation of communication intervention programs. Many times educators will overlook the underlying language problems of children and focus more on academic, social, and behavioral problems than on inadequate communication skills. Since researchers have addressed the connection between language and social skills and between language and emotional and behavioral problems, educators and speech-language pathologists working in school systems need to continue to be sensitive to the interweaving of these areas. Furthermore, speech-language pathologists need to be particularly alert to the under-identification of children with social deficits. A focus needs to be placed on other educational professionals in the appropriate referral of students with possible undiagnosed language challenges (Sigafoos et al., 2004).

Well-developed social skills can also mitigate the link between juvenile delinquency and learning disabilities. According to Mallett (2014), “Adolescents becoming formally involved with a juvenile court because of school-related behavior and discipline problems is a phenomenon known as the school-to-prison pipeline. Adolescents with learning disabilities are disproportionately represented within this pipeline.” Mallett’s study reviewed the outcomes for a population of youthful offenders in two juvenile courts in the Midwest, and it was found that “youthful offenders with learning disabilities, when compared with nondisabled youthful offenders, were more likely to be suspended from school, were adjudicated delinquent at younger ages, and were more frequently held in detention centers.”

Teens with learning disabilities are more likely to be convicted of their crimes because they are unable to plan and execute their actions. They also receive harsher court sentences because they have a harder time navigating the court systems. They may miss appointments with their attorneys and not understand court etiquette (Lavoie, 2005 p. xxviii). Adolescents and teens that can compensate for their inferior learning skills with adequate social skills are better positioned to avoid the school-too-prison pipeline.

Improving Social Skills in Children & AdolescentsImproving Social Skills in Children & Adolescents is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses the social skills children and adolescents will need to develop to be successful in school and beyond. It will demonstrate the challenges and difficulties that arise from a deficit of these crucial skills, as well as the benefits and advantages that can come about with well-developed social skills. This course will also provide practical tools that teachers and therapists can employ to guide children to overcome their difficulties in the social realm and gain social competence. While there are hundreds of important social skills for students to learn, we can organize them into skill areas to make it easier to identify and determine appropriate interventions. This course is divided into 10 chapters, each detailing various aspects of social skills that children, teens, and adults must master to have normative, healthy relationships with the people they encounter every day. This course provides tools and suggestions that, with practice and support, can assist them in managing their social skills deficits to function in society and nurture relationships with the peers and adults in their lives. Course #40-40 | 2016 | 62 pages | 35 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

About the Authors:

Adina Soclof, MS, CCC-SLP, a certified Speech-Language Pathologist, received her master’s degree from Hunter College in New York in Communication Sciences. She is the Director of Parent Outreach for A+ Learning and Development Centers facilitating “How to Talk so Kids will Listen and Listen so Kids will Talk” workshops as well as workshops based on “Siblings Without Rivalry.” Adina is the founder of ParentingSimply.com, a division of A+ Learning and Development Centers. You can reach her and check out her website at www.parentingsimply.com.

Leo Christie, PhD, LMFT, is a Florida-licensed Marriage and Family Therapist with a doctorate in Marriage and Family Therapy from Florida State University. Past President of the Florida Council on Family Relations, Dr. Christie is currently CEO of Professional Development Resources, a nonprofit corporation whose mission is to deliver continuing education credit courses to healthcare professionals throughout the United States. He has more than 20 years’ experience in private practice with a specialty in child behavior disorders and as an instructor for over 500 live continuing education seminars for healthcare professionals.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

Mind-Healing Activities: A Suicide Toolkit

10 Jun

By Jennifer Scott @spiritfinder.org/

Suicide Prevention ToolkitWhen you are faced with suicidal thoughts or have even made a past attempt, it can feel as though you have lost all control over your mind. You don’t want to feel this way, but your brain simply won’t give it a rest. Rest assured, it is nothing you’ve done and it is possible to break free. Take a look at the resources in this toolkit for guidance, and use the mind-healing activities to re-focus your thoughts and turn them into something positive.

Mental Health Resources

The first step on the road to healing is to seek help. Although you may feel alone, you are far from it. Getting a support system together will enable you to jumpstart the process, and these resources are a great place to begin:


Mind-Healing Activities:

Mindfulness Meditation

Often times when you are experiencing negative thoughts, you feel as though you can’t get a handle on them. As hard as you try, you can’t seem to gain control. Mindfulness meditation is a focused approach to taking control of your thoughts in which you are paying attention to the present moment, including your thoughts, emotions, and sensations. Using breathing techniques, you can achieve a heightened sense of awareness in a matter of minutes no matter where you are.

Mindfulness meditation not only refocuses your thoughts, but research has shown that it physically alters your brain. Participants in a 2016 study practiced meditation for three days. At the end of those three days, brain scans showed increased activity in the areas of the brain that process stress and give you a sense of calm. While there isn’t an ideal dose for meditation, it can be done in a matter of minutes, fitting into even the busiest of schedules.

Prayer

Prayer is a powerful coping mechanism. People of faith who regularly pray are less likely to fall into depression and commit suicide due to the hope and optimism they hold onto for the future. Scientists have found that prayer and spirituality are sources of hope and strength which act as buffers against stress, anxiety, pain, addiction, and depression. Prayer is also an effective way to keep stress and anxiety at a minimum or banish them all together. Releasing your day’s worries and giving them over to a higher power can be liberating and leave you ready to set new goals.

There are also many health benefits of a positive spiritual life. For example, engaging in prayer triggers a relaxation response. When your mind is calm and relaxed, blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate lower. You can think more clearly and your body stays in a low stress state, leaving you centered and focused on recovery. In addition, your body will have more resources to devote to healing if you are feeling positive and less stressed.

Journaling

Have you ever had so many thoughts going through your head that you don’t know where to turn? Journaling is a great way to get everything out in the open so you can start to understand your feelings one thought at a time. The two main objectives are to recapture the moment and learn from it. At the end of the day, take a second to write down how you felt throughout the day or reacted to certain events. This is a safe place for you to write about everything you are experiencing.

While you may have had a rough day, try to find lessons you’ve learned and recognize the positive moments. Even if it was something as simple as a greeting from the mailman or finding your favorite movie on television, write it down. You may gain perspective into how you see yourself and the world. Journaling is also a great way to track your progress, and may alert you to patterns in your thoughts and even your actions.

Further Healing

The above activities are a great start, but keep in mind that anything that engages your mind and promotes positive thinking is considered a method of healing. You can come up with your own ideas, but here are some more suggestions:


With the right resources and activities, you can find relief from your thoughts and finally start moving forward. Remember, healing takes time, but with the right help and tools, you can overcome this.

Related Online Continuing Education (CE) Course:

Suicide Prevention: Evidence-Based StrategiesSuicide Prevention: Evidence-Based Strategies is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that reviews evidence-based research and offers strategies for screening, assessment, treatment, and prevention of suicide in both adolescents and adults. Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. In 2015, 44,193 people killed themselves. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes, “Suicide is a serious but preventable public health problem that can have lasting harmful effects on individuals, families, and communities.” People who attempt suicide but do not die face potentially serious injury or disability, depending on the method used in the attempt. Depression and other mental health issues follow the suicide attempt. Family, friends, and coworkers are negatively affected by suicide. Shock, anger, guilt, and depression arise in the wake of this violent event. Even the community as a whole is affected by the loss of a productive member of society, lost wages not spent at local businesses, and medical costs. The CDC estimates that suicides result in over 44 billion dollars in work loss and medical costs. Prevention is key: reducing risk factors and promoting resilience. This course will provide a review of evidence-based studies on this complex subject for psychologists, marriage & family therapists, professional counselors, and social workers. Information from the suicide prevention technical package from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be provided. Included also are strategies for screening and assessment, prevention considerations, methods of treatment, and resources for choosing evidence-based suicide prevention programs. Course #30-97 | 2017 | 60 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD)

09 Jun

Course excerpt from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

OCPDObsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder differs from OCD in that the symptoms are ego-syntonic. Typically the people surrounding the person with OCPD will be more negatively affected by the disorder than the individual with the disorder.

OCPD is a pattern of behavior or personality that emphasizes orderliness, perfectionism, mental and interpersonal control, and rule following. Individuals with OCPD preoccupy themselves with attention to details, lists, organization, and schedules and experience distress when life intervenes and causes deviation. There may also be rigidity with respect to morality ethics or values that they and others should strictly follow. They strive for perfection in their work and productivity, often to the exclusion of social and leisure activities. Their attention to details and desire for impeccable performance may delay actual completion of tasks. They may have difficulty prioritizing activities because of their need to have everything completed perfectly, and often forego vacations.

The characteristics of OCPD broadly affect the individual’s personality, cognition, affect, interpersonal functioning, and interpersonal control. Although these personality traits may cause distress and impairment, they are stable and not episodic.

OCD and OCPD have similar characteristics and may sometimes be comorbid. Technically, OCPD should be ruled out during an active OCD episode, and then diagnosed when the person is back to their functional baseline. In instances of comorbidity, treatment should focus first on the ego-dystonic symptoms of the OCD in order to better assess the OCPD symptoms.

Motivation for change in people with OCDP is low since they don’t experience distress from their symptoms. Longer term CBT or psychotherapy may be helpful when the person experiences enough negative consequences from their rigid interpersonal and functional style of living.

According to studies on comorbid OCD and OCPD, the range of prevalence falls between 23%–36%.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews the diagnosis, assessment and treatment strategies for OCD. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is characterized by intrusive, unwanted, and anxiety-provoking thoughts, images, impulses and rituals that are performed to alleviate the accompanying distress. Because OCD is a heterogeneous disorder with several subtypes, assessing, diagnosing, and treating it can be challenging. Further, the presentation of varying symptoms may be considered to be OC Related Disorders. Being able to make differential diagnoses and treatment recommendations are essential in clinical work with the many patients that present with the spectrum of OC problems. Specific behavioral strategies have been developed and validated in the literature that target the various manifestations of OCD and related disorders. The first part of the course offers information on the neurobiology, diagnosis and assessment tools, including the various subtypes, and highlights important topics to be taken into consideration during the process. Emotional and cognitive factors are outlined that seem to play important roles in the diagnosis and the course of episodes. The next section is dedicated to describing the clinical factors of and differential aspects of the OC Related Disorders and their prevalence. A case study follows that outlines the precipitating events, assessment, and behavioral treatment of a college student who is struggling to maintain and overcome her OCD. The final section describes effective treatment and coping strategies and augmentations that help to maintain treatment gains. Course #30-95 | 2017 | 60 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

About the Author:

Leslie Shapiro, LICSW, has been a Behavior Therapist treating OCD and Related Disorders since 1989 at the OCD Institute since its inception in 1997. She is the author of Understanding OCD: Skills to Control the Conscience and Outsmart Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and has published several peer reviewed articles. She was awarded a McLean Hospital Career Development Grant, which supported her research on guilt aspects of OCD, and published Pathological guilt: A persistent yet overlooked treatment factor in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Ms. Shapiro has lectured extensively on the assessment and treatment of OCD, BDD and family issues, and continues her research on conscience-related factors in OCD. She is a former Peace Corps Volunteer and served in Mali as a health educator from 1982-1984.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

 

Florida SLP License Renewal & CEU Info

08 Jun

Florida SLPs Save 20% on CEUs @pdresources.org

Florida-licensed speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists have an upcoming license renewal deadline of December 31, 2017. The following continuing education (CE/CEU) requirements must be met in order to renew:

CE Required: 30 hours every 2 years (50 if dual-licensed), of which:
2 hours Preventing Medical Errors is required each renewal
1 hour HIV/AIDS is required for initial licensure only
Online CE Allowed: No limit if ASHA-approved
Notes: 10 hr limit on non-clinical courses

All continuing education hours must be reported to CE Broker prior to licensees being able to renew their license.

Florida SLPs can earn all 30 hours required for renewal through board-approved online courses offered @pdresources.orgProfessional Development Resources is approved by the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM), the Florida Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology and is CE Broker compliant. We report all completions to CE Broker within just a few days.

Order now and save 20% on ALL courses:

Florida SLPs Save 20% on CEUs

Enjoy 20% off ALL Online CE courses for your Florida SLP license renewal! Use coupon code PDRPC340 at checkout to redeem. Valid on future orders only. Offers expire 12/31/2017.

Preventing Medical Errors in Speech-Language Pathology is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that addresses the impact of medical errors on today’s healthcare with a focus on root cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety. Multiple scenarios of real and potential errors in the practice of speech-language pathology are included, along with recommended strategies for preventing them. Evidence shows that the most effective error prevention occurs when a partnership exists among care facilities, health care professionals, and the patients they treat. *This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for license renewal of Florida SLPs. Course #21-10 | 2016 | 33 pages | 14 posttest questions

Executive Functioning: Teaching Children Organizational SkillsExecutive Functioning: Teaching Children Organizational Skills is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that will enumerate and illustrate multiple strategies and tools for helping children overcome executive functioning deficits and improve their self-esteem and organizational abilities. Executive functioning skills represent a key set of mental assets that help connect past experience with present action. They are fundamental to performing activities such as planning, organizing, strategizing, paying attention to and remembering details, and managing time and space. Conversely, executive functioning deficits can significantly disrupt an individual’s ability to perform even simple tasks effectively. Although children with executive functioning difficulties may be at a disadvantage at home and at school, adults can employ many different strategies to help them succeed. Included are techniques for planning and prioritizing, managing emotions, improving communication, developing stress tolerance, building time management skills, increasing sustained attention, and boosting working memory. Course #40-42 | 2017 | 76 pages | 25 posttest questions

Active ListeningActive Listening: Techniques that Work for Children and Parents is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that offers a valuable compilation of practical and ready-to-use strategies and techniques for achieving more effective communication through active listening. One of the fundamental tools of clinicians who work effectively with children and adolescents is the art of listening. Without this set of skills, clinicians are likely to miss essential pieces of information their clients are trying to communicate to them, whether with words or with behavior. When the word “active” is added to “listening” it alters and amplifies the communication process to include a dynamic feedback loop in which the speaker and the listener validate that each party has been accurately heard. Appropriate use of listening skills by a clinician can increase self-esteem in young clients and motivate them to learn. Using active listening skills, clinicians become more confident and manage their therapy and counseling sessions with a broader and mutually respectful dialogue. This course will teach clinicians how to employ innovative and practical communication and conversational skills in their individual and group therapy sessions with clients and their families, as well as in their working relationships with other professionals. These techniques can be applied to a wide variety of clinical, classroom and home situations, and case examples are included. Also included are sections on positive thinking and resilience, problem-solving skills, and the communication of emotion. Course #30-90 | 2017 | 70 pages | 20 posttest questions

Improving Social Skills in Children & AdolescentsImproving Social Skills in Children & Adolescents is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses the social skills children and adolescents will need to develop to be successful in school and beyond. It will demonstrate the challenges and difficulties that arise from a deficit of these crucial skills, as well as the benefits and advantages that can come about with well-developed social skills. This course will also provide practical tools that teachers and therapists can employ to guide children to overcome their difficulties in the social realm and gain social competence. While there are hundreds of important social skills for students to learn, we can organize them into skill areas to make it easier to identify and determine appropriate interventions. This course is divided into 10 chapters, each detailing various aspects of social skills that children, teens, and adults must master to have normative, healthy relationships with the people they encounter every day. This course provides tools and suggestions that, with practice and support, can assist them in managing their social skills deficits to function in society and nurture relationships with the peers and adults in their lives. Course #40-40 | 2016 | 62 pages | 35 posttest questions

More courses available @pdresources.org

Professional Development Resources is approved by the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM) to provide continuing education activities in speech-language pathology and audiology. See course page for number of ASHA CEUs, expiration date, instructional level and content area. ASHA CE provider approval does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products or clinical procedures.

We report all course completions to ASHA quarterly as long as (a) you select “yes” for ASHA reporting and (b) you provide your ASHA number in your account profile. ASHA requires us to file course completions on a quarterly basis (1st qtr Jan-Mar, 2nd qtr Apr-June, 3rd qtr July-Sept, 4th qtr Oct-Dec). The last day of the quarter in which you complete a course is the date that will appear on your ASHA transcript. For example, if you complete a course on 10/31 it will be reported to ASHA in early January with a 12/31 completion date.

Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology and is CE Broker compliant. We report all completion to CEB within just a few days.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be.