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Anxiety in Children – New Online CE Course

23 May

New Online CE Course @pdresources.org

Anxiety in ChildrenAnxiety in Children is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that focuses on behavioral interventions for children with anxiety disorders. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (2017), it is estimated that 40 million Americans suffer from anxiety disorders. Anxiety disorders affect one in eight children, but is often not diagnosed. Untreated anxiety can lead to substance abuse, difficulties in school, and depression. Professionals who work with children, including speech language pathologists, mental health professionals, and occupational therapists, frequently encounter anxiety disorders among their young clients.

This course is intended to help clinicians recognize and understand the anxiety disorders that frequently occur in children and learn a wide variety of communication and behavioral strategies for helping their clients manage their anxiety. Included are sections on types and causes of anxiety disorders, strategies for prevention, evidence-based treatments, techniques for helping children manage worry, relaxation techniques for use with children, and detailed discussions on school anxiety and social anxiety. Course #40-43 | 2017 | 69 pages | 25 posttest questions


This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

About the Authors:

Adina Soclof, MS, CCC-SLP, a certified Speech-Language Pathologist, received her master’s degree from Hunter College in New York in Communication Sciences. She is the Director of Parent Outreach for A+ Learning and Development Centers facilitating “How to Talk so Kids will Listen and Listen so Kids will Talk” workshops as well as workshops based on “Siblings Without Rivalry.” Adina is the founder of ParentingSimply.com, a division of A+ Learning and Development Centers. You can reach her and check out her website at www.parentingsimply.com.

Leo Christie, PhD, LMFT, is a Florida-licensed Marriage and Family Therapist with a doctorate in Marriage and Family Therapy from Florida State University. Past President of the Florida Council on Family Relations, Dr. Christie is currently CEO of Professional Development Resources, a nonprofit corporation whose mission is to deliver continuing education credit courses to healthcare professionals throughout the United States. He has more than 20 years’ experience in private practice with a specialty in child behavior disorders and as an instructor for over 500 live continuing education seminars for healthcare professionals.

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

Duty to Warn: Don’t Get Distracted

19 May

Course excerpt from Therapy Tidbits – May/June 2017

Duty to WarnSome years ago, a psychologist in Wausau, WI, found himself worrying about the increasingly angry talk by a client. He was distracted as he tried to remember the “duty to warn” standard, which is a specific case and not a statute in Wisconsin, and suddenly found himself fighting for his life. He survived the 37 stab wounds from a letter opener. The lesson he wants people to know: Forget about dangers to third parties – you are the person at risk until the client is out of your office.

During the last two years, there have been “duty to warn” cases that have ended up causing anxiety, but more important, being a distraction. Neither case challenged the notion as to what the essential “duty to warn” is – basically, if you think your client is about to go out and seriously harm someone, you should try to prevent it. Typically, a call to law enforcement, or in some circumstances the intended victim, is all you can do to prevent immediate violence.

It is important to recognize that case law continues to evolve and that cases are typically very much tied to the past decisions as well as any statutes in a given venue. Furthermore, unless it is a U.S. Supreme Court decision, there can always be a higher court that overturns a decision. In Washington State the decision in Peterson v. State (100 Wn.2d 421) ruled that a psychiatrist could have liability in a case where, absent a specific threat of harm, the psychiatrist should have reasonably known that people were at risk of harm. In this instance, there was no connection between the victim and the person who harmed her.

Relying on the Peterson standard, the Court of Appeals, Division Three, in the case of Volk v. DeMeerlear, ruled that a psychiatrist might have had a duty to protect persons who were not the subject of any threat from the patient. In this case, the patient, who had been in treatment for nine years, without warning attacked and murdered two people and injured a third.

There was no evidence that the psychiatrist could have known that those people would become targets. In its 50-page opinion filed Nov. 13, 2014, the court relied on expert testimony by an expert employed by the plaintiffs, James L. Knoll, IV, MD, the editor of Psychiatric Times. He opined that the psychiatrist failed to properly assess the dangerousness and other clinical matters, and that had he done so the degree of risk might have been clear. He also opined that the intervention by the psychiatrist was not sufficient.

It now goes back to the trial court to see if the jury determines the psychiatrist could have done better.

The issues as to coverage for persons under the supervision of a licensed person became the focus of attention after the findings of the State of Minnesota Court of Appeals in the case of Jerry Expose Jr. vs. Thad Wilderson and Associates, P.A. and Nina Mattson filed May 4, 2015 in Ramsey County District Court. (File No. 62-CV-13-5229). The Minnesota Supreme Court agreed with the court of appeals in a decision filed Nov. 30, 2016.

Meanwhile several licensing boards changed their laws so that trainees are covered. The other findings – that duty to warn does not allow you to discuss the client’s treatment without consent, and that a client handout is not permission to disclose, were no surprise.

In short, despite all of the anxiety created by these two cases, they were really tempests in a teapot. Secondly, a well-constructed statute in the area of duty to warn is always a good idea. Case law is not a good way to go.

Therapy Tidbits – May/June 2017 is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that covers a variety of therapy topics in a succinct and reader-friendly format. This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046, ACE Program); the Florida Boards of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (#BAP346) and Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

The Fast Food Fast Track to Depression

18 May

Course excerpt from Nutrition and Mental Health: Advanced Clinical Concepts

Fast Food Fast Track to DepressionYou already know it’s not good for you, but scientists from the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and the University of Granada, wanted to find out just how bad for your mental health fast food really is. Analyzing data from 8,964 participants – that had never been diagnosed with depression or taken antidepressants – of the SUN Project, researchers assessed people for an average of six months.

What were the results? Consumers of fast food, compared to those who eat little or none, were found to be 51% more likely to develop depression. Even more compelling was that the link between fast food and depression appears to be dose responsive – that is the more you eat, the greater your risk (Sanchez-Villegas et al., 2015).

And this was actually a duplicate study. The SUN project had already uncovered a link between fast food and depression in its 2011 study. There, fast food consumers were found to be 42 percent more likely to develop depression than those who consumed no fast food (Sanchez-Villegas et al., 2011).

If you are thinking that just a little won’t hurt you, you’d be wrong. According to one of the university researchers who participated in the study, “Even eating small quantities is linked to a significantly higher chance of developing depression.” What’s the takeaway? That happy meal might not only be promising more than it can deliver; it might actually be making us feel worse.

We know that eating more fruits and vegetables, nuts, and foods high in omega-3 fatty acids, and eating less fast food improves mood and lowers levels of depression. Yet the question still remains: How much does caloric intake affect how we feel?

Nutrition and Mental HealthNutrition and Mental Health: Advanced Clinical Concepts is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that examines how what we eat influences how we feel, both physically and mentally. While the role of adequate nutrition in maintaining mental health has been established for some time, just how clinicians go about providing the right nutritional information to the patient at the right time – to not just ensure good mental health, but actually optimize mood – has not been so clear. With myriad diets, weight loss supplements and programs, clients often find themselves reaching for the next best nutritional solution, all the while, unsure how they will feel, or even what to eat to feel better. On the other side of the equation, clinicians so often face not just a client’s emotional, situational, and relational concerns, but concerns that are clearly mired in how the client feels physically, and what impact his/her nutritional health may have on these concerns. For example, research into the role of blood sugar levels has demonstrated a clear crossover with client impulse control. Additionally, the gut microbiome, and its role in serotonin production and regulation has consistently made clear that without good gut health, mitigating anxiety and depression becomes close to impossible.

So if good mental health begins with good nutritional health, where should clinicians start? What advice should they give to a depressed client? An anxious client? A client with impulse control problems? This course will answer these questions and more. Comprised of three sections, the course will begin with an overview of macronutrient intake and mental health, examining recent popular movements such as intermittent fasting, carb cycling and ketogenic diets, and their impact on mental health. In section two, we will look specifically at the role of blood sugar on mental health, and research that implicates blood sugar as both an emotional and behavioral regulator. Gut health, and specifically the gut microbiome, and its influence on mood and behavior will then be explored. Lastly, specific diagnoses and the way they are impacted by specific vitamins and minerals will be considered. Section three will deliver specific tools, you, the clinician, can use with your clients to assess, improve and maximize nutrition to optimize mental health. Course #11-06 | 2017 | 21 pages | 10 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) – New CE Course

17 May

New Online CE @pdresources.org

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a new 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews the diagnosis, assessment and treatment strategies for OCD.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is characterized by intrusive, unwanted, and anxiety-provoking thoughts, images, impulses and rituals that are performed to alleviate the accompanying distress. Because OCD is a heterogeneous disorder with several subtypes, assessing, diagnosing, and treating it can be challenging. Further, the presentation of varying symptoms may be considered to be OC Related Disorders. Being able to make differential diagnoses and treatment recommendations are essential in clinical work with the many patients that present with the spectrum of OC problems. Specific behavioral strategies have been developed and validated in the literature that target the various manifestations of OCD and related disorders.

The first part of the course offers information on the neurobiology, diagnosis and assessment tools, including the various subtypes, and highlights important topics to be taken into consideration during the process. Emotional and cognitive factors are outlined that seem to play important roles in the diagnosis and the course of episodes. The next section is dedicated to describing the clinical factors of and differential aspects of the OC Related Disorders and their prevalence. A case study follows that outlines the precipitating events, assessment, and behavioral treatment of a college student who is struggling to maintain and overcome her OCD. The final section describes effective treatment and coping strategies and augmentations that help to maintain treatment gains. Course #30-95 | 2017 | 60 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.
Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).
About the Author:
Leslie Shapiro, LICSW, has been a Behavior Therapist treating OCD and Related Disorders since 1989 at the OCD Institute since its inception in 1997. She is the author of Understanding OCD: Skills to Control the Conscience and Outsmart Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and has published several peer reviewed articles. She was awarded a McLean Hospital Career Development Grant, which supported her research on guilt aspects of OCD, and published Pathological guilt: A persistent yet overlooked treatment factor in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Ms. Shapiro has lectured extensively on the assessment and treatment of OCD, BDD and family issues, and continues her research on conscience-related factors in OCD. She is a former Peace Corps Volunteer and served in Mali as a health educator from 1982-1984.
 

Do Babies Learn From Digital Media?

12 May

Course excerpt from Effects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and Learning

Do babies learn from digital media?Anecdotal reports from many parents suggest that their babies are learning to read, or count, simply from their exposure to “educational apps” on a variety of digital devices. We have previously read about some companies that label children’s software as educational, even if they have no evidence to support the teaching claims. Current research is underway to more clearly delineate what babies and toddlers can learn from digital technology. A few of the recent studies which have been published provide evidence that suggests that much of what is being advertised at “educational” technology, as well as software, may not really be developing babies’ cognition. Some of the researchers of studies we will review next have strong concerns about the amount of time that babies are left in front of video/media screens or devices.

Neuman, Kaefer, Pinkham & Strouse (2014) used a randomized trial of what they termed “baby media” to answer the question, “Can babies learn to read?” They developed their study in response to the high number of baby media products on the market that target children as young as 3 months of age, and purport that their product will teach babies to read. They developed a randomized controlled trial to investigate the effects of a best-selling, well-known baby media product on reading development. This study included 117 infants between the ages of 9 and 18 months, who were randomly assigned to treatment and control groups. The baby media product that was being used in this experiment included DVDs, picture and word flashcards, and word books. The materials were used daily, according to the product’s instructions for a 7-month period for the children in the experimental group.

Following the use of the intervention, Neuman, et al. (2014) found no evidence to indicate that babies in the treatment group could read or attend to words or text any differently than the children who had not had the 7-month period of instruction (the control group). Interestingly, the parents of the children in the treatment group reported that their children did know significantly more words in the program than those in the control group. However, these differences were not supported by the standardized vocabulary measure used by the researchers. That is, although the parents of the children who had the 7 months of instruction believed that their babies were beginning to read, these children were not able to identify words or phrases after the completion of the intervention. The results of Neuman, et al. (2014) indicated that babies did not learn to read using baby media, even though some parents continued to display great confidence in the program and purported that their babies were beginning to read.

Clearly, parents do need to have more information provided to them that will assist them in selecting appropriate technology and software. In the survey studies discussed earlier in this course, many parents expressed the need for more information that they can use to identify digital technology that can positively benefit their young children. As a result, current research is beginning to provide this type of information, which will assist parents and practitioners in selecting appropriate technology and software.

Williams and Lee (2016) recently published an article with suggestions for helping parents, children and teachers to navigate their way in today’s world of conflicting messages about technology and media. They pointed out that literature doesn’t even agree on what “technology” entails, and began their article with a 2012 position statement that jointly issued by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at Saint Vincent College. Included is an abbreviated version of the definitions used in this position statement, but the process of traditional refereed publications in professional literature inadvertently leaves us in a time-delay from what has been considered to be “current literature.” We simply cannot keep up with the incredible speed of what is published online through blogs, position states, and an ever increasing number of reputable sources for evidence based information.

Since many technology products are being marketed as learning tools, and both parents and teachers want to help children learn, the logical conclusion is that parents and teachers must be able to discern which technology tools are appropriate for infants’ and toddlers’ learning. Early childhood educators are also advised to approach the use of technology from a position of balance. That is, according to Williams and Lee (2016) “Any use of technology should be safe, encourage verbal thinking and social interactions, and allow for freedom of exploration” (259).

Effects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and LearningEffects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and Learning is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews the research on media use and offers guidance for educators and parents to regulate their children’s use of digital devices. Today’s world is filled with smartphones used by people ignoring their surroundings and even texting while driving, which is criminally dangerous. Are there other dangers that may not be as apparent? Media technology (e.g., smart phones, tablets, or laptop computers) have changed the world. Babies and children are affected and research reveals that 46% of children under age one, and up to 59% of eight-year-old children are exposed to cell phones. In England, nearly 80% of senior primary-school staff reportedly are worried about poor social skills or speech problems of children entering school, which they attribute to the use of media devices. Media technology affects family life, children’s readiness for entering school or preschool, and classroom learning. Recent research delineates a developmental progression of understanding information on devices for children between ages 2- 5 years. Younger children may believe false information if it is on a computer. This research is important for understanding technology uses in education. There are also known health risks and possible adverse effects to social-emotional development. Statistics describing the increase of media technology and developing trends in media use are presented along with guidelines and position statements developed to protect children from risks and adverse effects. Course #30-96 | 2017 | 50 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

Virginia Counselors License Renewal & CE Info

11 May

Virginia Counselors Save 20% on CE @pdresources.org

Virginia Licensed Professional Counselors (LPCs) have an upcoming license renewal deadline of June 30, 2017. All LPCs who wish to renew are required to have completed a minimum of 20 hours of continuing competency for each annual licensure renewal. A minimum of two of these hours shall be in courses that emphasize the ethics, standards of practice or laws governing behavioral science professions in Virginia.

Virginia Board Of Counseling 
CE Required: 20 hours per year
Online CE Allowed: No limit
License Expiration: 6/30, annually
National Accreditation Accepted: APA, NBCC
Notes: 2 hrs in ethics, standards of practice, or laws governing behavioral science professions in Virginia required each renewal
Date of Info: 5/11/2017

Virginia counselors can earn all 20 hours required for renewal through APA/NBCC-approved online courses offered @pdresources.org. Order now and save 20% on ALL courses:

Click to Save 20% on CE!

Click here to view NBCC-approved online CE courses.

Professional Development Resources has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5590. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Professional Development Resources is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

Ethics & Boundaries in PsychotherapyEthics & Boundaries in Psychotherapy is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course intended to give psychotherapists the tools they need to resolve the common and not-so-common ethical and boundary issues and dilemmas that they may expect to encounter in their everyday professional practice in the 21st century. Among the topics discussed are definitions of boundaries; resolving conflicts between ethics and the law; boundary crossings vs. boundary violations; multiple relationships; sexual misconduct; privacy and confidentiality in the age of HIPAA and the Patriot Act; ethics issues with dangerous clients; boundary issues in clinical supervision; ethics and cultural competency; ethical boundaries in use of social media; ethical practice in teletherapy; fees and financial relationships; and a 17-step model for ethical decision making. Course #30-77 | 2017 | 42 pages | 21 posttest questions

This course satisfies the ethics & boundaries requirement for license renewal of Florida counselors, social workers & MFTs. It also include teachings from the 2014 ACA Code of Ethics to meet the ethics requirement of West Virginia counselors.

Gender Identity and TransgenderismGender Identity and Transgenderism is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that reviews issues in the formation of gender identity and the possible resultant condition of transgenderism, formerly transsexuality. After viewing oneself as a human being, the most important aspect of our self-concept is that we are a male person or a female person. That is the very essence of our humanness and the most basic sense of who we are. To experience a conflict between our physical body and our concept of maleness or femaleness is the most fundamental existential distress imaginable. This course will discuss the ongoing distinction between sex and gender, causes and prevalence of transgenderism, harassment of transgender children, DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, theories of gender development, conversion therapy, modern medical and socio-psychological treatment of transgender patients, passing, and postsurgical relationships and therapy. Certain prominent transgenderists are discussed, and several autobiographies are referenced to further our understanding of the complex transgender life experiences. Finally, some examples of positive changes are presented, which increase the knowledge base for the professionals who see transgender patients in their practices, along with other nascent societal changes, which, in turn, can improve these patient’s lives. Course #30-91 | 2016 | 41 pages | 20 posttest questions

Counseling the Pastor's KidCounseling the Pastor’s Kid (PK) is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that will provide clinicians with an understanding of the complex factors that cause stress in PKs, along with recommendations for prevention and treatment. It has been long observed that the ministry is one of the most frustrating and stressful working professions, due largely to the complex dynamics that exist between clergy and their congregations. Among the consequences of these pervasive stressors are high levels of chronic anxiety, depression, and burnout. What has received less focus and commentary is the plight of many of the children of these clergy – the “pastor’s kids.” Known in the vernacular as “PKs,” these children and adolescents are exposed to many of the same chronic stressors that take such a toll on their clergy parents. The differences are that the children (1) did not voluntary enter the ministry, (2) are not developmentally prepared to cope with complex adult stressors, and (3) do not have the opportunity to develop a sense of self free from the constraints of intense social pressure. The goal and purpose of this course is to enable readers to understand the issues and stresses of a clergy family and how they affect the children in these families. It is likely that most mental health professionals will encounter clergy – and their children – among the clients they treat in their practices. The course is divided into two parts. Part one focuses on the specific challenges PKs face growing up. These challenges fall into seven specific areas: 1) behavioral expectations imposed upon the child by family, church congregations, peers and self; 2) stereotypes imposed upon the child through psychological, sociological, and anthropological influences; 3) life experiences that are universally perceived by PKs as negative; 4) spiritual development; 5) blurring of parental boundaries; 6) psychosocial issues; and 7) coping mechanisms employed by the PK. The second part focuses on 1) using Bowen’s Family Systems Theory as a basis for assessment and treatment of the PK and the family; 2) illustrating the use of a genogram as a viable tool in understanding multigenerational processes; and 3) suggestions for counselors and parents. Course #30-93 | 2017 | 45 pages | 20 posttest questions

Over 100 online courses are available @pdresources.org.

Online courses provide instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

 

 

North Carolina OT License Renewal & CEU Info

10 May

North Carolina OTs Save 20% on CEUs @pdresources.org

North Carolina-licensed Occupational Therapists (OTs) have an upcoming license renewal deadline of June 30, 2017. Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants applying for license renewal shall document having earned a minimum of 15 points for approved continuing competence activities.

North Carolina Board of Occupational Therapy 
CE Required: 15 points (hours) per year
Online CE Allowed: No limit if AOTA-approved
License Expiration: 6/30, annually
National Accreditation Accepted: AOTA
Notes: 1 hr OT ethics required each renewal
Date of Info: 5/10/2017

All continuing competence courses and activities must relate to roles and responsibilities in occupational therapy and must enhance the therapist’s continuing competence. Licensees have to submit proof of completion of continuing competence activities and shall keep such proof for at least two (2) years and may be subject to random audits by the Board. Each licensee shall document completion of at least one contact hour (one point) of an ethics course related to the practice of occupational therapy. The one point may be included in the total of the required point total for the renewal period.

North Carolina OTs can earn all 15 hours required for renewal through AOTA-approved online CEUs offered @pdresources.org. Order now and save 20% on ALL courses:

Click to save 20% on AOTA CEUs

Click here to view AOTA-approved online CEUs!

Professional Development Resources is an AOTA-approved provider of continuing education (#3159). The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA. Over 100 courses are available:

Ethics for Occupational TherapistsEthics for Occupational Therapists is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that teaches OTs how to handle ethical and moral dilemmas in practice. Ethical and moral issues pervade our lives, especially in the healthcare arena. Occupational therapists are frequently confronted with a variety of ethical and moral dilemmas, and their decisions can have long-range effects both professionally and personally. Why does one decision win out over another? What does the decision process involve? How do these decisions impact those involved? Occupational therapists, by the nature of choosing this particular profession, are engaged in an “ethic of care,” where activities of daily living are not just a function, but also an expression of values. Helping people maintain their maximum possible functioning is seen in relation to society and the common good of all persons. This is an abstract ideal that must be put into practice in an imperfect world. How does the occupational therapist make decisions about what is best for the person when there are difficult choices to make? This course will address these questions from the framework of ethical decision models and the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Code of Ethics. Course #30-89 | 2016 | 43 pages | 20 posttest questions

Improving Social Skills in Children & AdolescentsImproving Social Skills in Children & Adolescents is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses the social skills children and adolescents will need to develop to be successful in school and beyond. It will demonstrate the challenges and difficulties that arise from a deficit of these crucial skills, as well as the benefits and advantages that can come about with well-developed social skills. This course will also provide practical tools that teachers and therapists can employ to guide children to overcome their difficulties in the social realm and gain social competence. While there are hundreds of important social skills for students to learn, we can organize them into skill areas to make it easier to identify and determine appropriate interventions. This course is divided into 10 chapters, each detailing various aspects of social skills that children, teens, and adults must master to have normative, healthy relationships with the people they encounter every day. This course provides tools and suggestions that, with practice and support, can assist them in managing their social skills deficits to function in society and nurture relationships with the peers and adults in their lives. Course #40-40 | 2016 | 62 pages | 35 posttest questions

Effects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and LearningEffects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and Learning is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews the research on media use and offers guidance for educators and parents to regulate their children’s use of digital devices. Today’s world is filled with smartphones used by people ignoring their surroundings and even texting while driving, which is criminally dangerous. Are there other dangers that may not be as apparent? Media technology (e.g., smart phones, tablets, or laptop computers) have changed the world. Babies and children are affected and research reveals that 46% of children under age one, and up to 59% of eight-year-old children are exposed to cell phones. In England, nearly 80% of senior primary-school staff reportedly are worried about poor social skills or speech problems of children entering school, which they attribute to the use of media devices. Media technology affects family life, children’s readiness for entering school or preschool, and classroom learning. Recent research delineates a developmental progression of understanding information on devices for children between ages 2- 5 years. Younger children may believe false information if it is on a computer. This research is important for understanding technology uses in education. There are also known health risks and possible adverse effects to social-emotional development. Statistics describing the increase of media technology and developing trends in media use are presented along with guidelines and position statements developed to protect children from risks and adverse effects. Course #30-96 | 2017 | 50 pages | 20 posttest questions

Online courses provide instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion.

 

 

Effects of Digital Media on Children

09 May

New Online CE Course @pdresources.org

Effects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and LearningEffects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and Learning is a brand new (2017) 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews the research on media use and offers guidance for educators and parents to regulate their children’s use of digital devices.

Today’s world is filled with smartphones used by people ignoring their surroundings and even texting while driving, which is criminally dangerous. Are there other dangers that may not be as apparent? Media technology (e.g., smart phones, tablets, or laptop computers) have changed the world. Babies and children are affected and research reveals that 46% of children under age one, and up to 59% of eight-year-old children are exposed to cell phones. In England, nearly 80% of senior primary-school staff reportedly are worried about poor social skills or speech problems of children entering school, which they attribute to the use of media devices.

Media technology affects family life, children’s readiness for entering school or preschool, and classroom learning. Recent research delineates a developmental progression of understanding information on devices for children between ages 2- 5 years. Younger children may believe false information if it is on a computer. This research is important for understanding technology uses in education. There are also known health risks and possible adverse effects to social-emotional development. Statistics describing the increase of media technology and developing trends in media use are presented along with guidelines and position statements developed to protect children from risks and adverse effects. Course #30-96 | 2017 | 50 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion.
Click here to learn more
Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).
 

What are Executive Functioning Skills?

05 May

Course excerpt from Executive Functioning: Teaching Children Organizational Skills

Executive Functioning SkillsParents are often confused when they are told that their child has deficits in his “Executive Functions.” Those seem like big words to describe the frustrations of having a child who seems more disorganized than other children; the kid who often comes to school late and unprepared and always seems to be losing his homework, shoes, or games.

Executive functions are the self-regulating skills that we use every day in order to get any task done, from getting dressed and eating breakfast to getting a backpack packed and choosing which friend to play with. They help us plan, organize, make decisions, shift between situations or thoughts, control our emotions and impulsivity, and learn from past mistakes.

Dawson and Guare (2010) describe executive functioning skills as follows:

“Human beings have a built-in capacity to meet challenges and accomplish goals through the use of high-level cognitive functions called executive skills. These are the skills that help us to decide what activities or tasks we will pay attention to and which ones we will choose to do. Executive skills allow us to organize our behavior over time and override immediate demands in favor of longer-term goals. Through the use of these skills we can plan and organize activities, sustain attention, and persist to complete a task. Executive skills enable us to manage our emotions and our thoughts in order to work more efficiently and effectively. Simply stated, these skills help us to regulate our behavior” (p.1).

Executive functioning difficulties cause children and teens to struggle with many academic learning tasks. According to Howland (2010), executive functioning skills predict academic success more effectively than tests of academic achievement or cognitive ability. Children with poor executive functioning skills are at high risk for dropping out of school, as well as for social and behavioral problems (Lindsay & Dockrell, 2012). They often have compromised listening skills and difficulties following directions, which can compromise familial relationships and academic and social functioning.

Executive functioning difficulty is not necessarily considered a disability, yet it is a weakness in a key set of mental skills that helps connect past experience with present action. People use them to perform activities such as planning, organizing, strategizing, paying attention to and remembering details, and managing time and space.

We use the executive functions in our brains to:

  • Make plans
  • Keep track of time and finish work punctually
  • Multitask and keep track of more than one thing simultaneously
  • Meaningfully include past knowledge in discussions
  • Evaluate ideas and reflect on our work
  • Change our minds and make mid-course corrections while thinking, reading and writing
  • Ask for help or seek more information when needed
  • Engage in group dynamics
  • Wait our turn to speak
  • Apply previously learned information to solve problems
  • Analyze ideas


Deficits in this area can affect any task, from completing a homework assignment or getting dressed in the morning to doing laundry or grocery shopping.

Another way to understand executive functioning difficulties is to see how process works. Here is an example, broken down into six steps (Bhandari, 2015):

  1. Analyze a task to figure out what needs to be done
  2. Plan how to handle the task
  3. Break down the plan into a series of steps
  4. Figure out how much time is needed to carry out the plan, and set aside the time
  5. Make adjustments as needed
  6. Finish the task in the time allotted


If executive functioning is working well, the brain may go through these steps in a matter of seconds. If a child has weak executive skills, however, performing even a simple task can be challenging.

According to Howland (2010), educators have increasingly and appropriately focused on the development of executive functioning skills throughout middle school and high school. However, these skills don’t suddenly emerge in adolescence; the foundation is laid in early childhood and builds throughout the school years. We simply cannot afford to wait until middle school to begin to work on executive control.

Howland (2010) explains that given the right experiences, children can improve executive functioning skills from a young age. We need a developmentally appropriate curriculum that directly teaches executive functioning skills from the start of school, treating these processes as skills to be developed, rather than problem behaviors that need to be managed.

Executive functioning skills are also intricately linked to language development. Therefore, according to Romski et al. (2011) and Watts-Pappas and McLeod (2009), SLPs and other therapists are in a unique position to give parents the skills they need in order to help their children develop executive functioning skills.

Executive Functioning: Teaching Children Organizational SkillsExecutive Functioning: Teaching Children Organizational Skills is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that will enumerate and illustrate multiple strategies and tools for helping children overcome executive functioning deficits and improve their self-esteem and organizational abilities. Executive functioning skills represent a key set of mental assets that help connect past experience with present action. They are fundamental to performing activities such as planning, organizing, strategizing, paying attention to and remembering details, and managing time and space. Conversely, executive functioning deficits can significantly disrupt an individual’s ability to perform even simple tasks effectively. Although children with executive functioning difficulties may be at a disadvantage at home and at school, adults can employ many different strategies to help them succeed. Included are techniques for planning and prioritizing, managing emotions, improving communication, developing stress tolerance, building time management skills, increasing sustained attention, and boosting working memory. Course #40-42 | 2017 | 76 pages | 25 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501) and the Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

Cinco de Mayo CE Fiesta!

04 May

Cinco de Mayo CE Fiesta @pdresources.org

Instantly save $5 on all continuing education orders of $25 or more during our Cinco de Mayo CE Fiesta!

Cinco de Mayo CE Fiesta

Have a coupon? Apply it at checkout for even greater savings > Shop now!

Your instant savings will automatically apply at checkout based on order total (after coupons). Valid on future orders only. Sale ends Sunday, May 7, 2017.

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. Our purpose is to provide high quality online continuing education (CE) courses on topics relevant to members of the healthcare professions we serve. We strive to keep our carbon footprint small by being completely paperless, allowing telecommuting, recycling, using energy-efficient lights and powering off electronics when not in use. We provide online CE courses to allow our colleagues to earn credits from the comfort of their own home or office so we can all be as green as possible (no paper, no shipping or handling, no travel expenses, etc.). Sustainability isn’t part of our work – it’s a guiding influence for all of our work.

We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within one week of completion).